Cultural Home of Japan

Trip Start Jan 01, 2014
1
10
428
Trip End Dec 31, 2014


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Where I stayed
Kyoto Royal Hotel

Flag of Japan  , Kyoto,
Saturday, October 10, 1981

Kyoto Royal Hotel


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Kyoto was the imperial capital of Japan after Naraj, but before it was moved to Edo (Tokyo).    It's still considered the cultural home of Japan, because (from Wiki) "Kyoto was spared from the firebombing of World War II. With its 2000 religious places- 1600 Buddhist temples and 400 Shinto shrines, as well as palaces, gardens and architecture intact, it is one of the best preserved cities in Japan."


KYOTO


 



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From sacred destinations:
'Byōdōin is a much-loved Pure Land Buddhist temple in the city of Uji in the Kyoto prefecture. A National Treasure and a World Heritage Site, its outline is featured on the 10 coin.
History of Byodo-in

Built in 998 AD during the Heian period, Byodoin was originally a private residence (like most Japanese temples). It was converted into a temple by a member of the Fujiwara clan in 1052. The Phoenix Hall was added in 1053 to house the Amida Buddha image. The temple complex was once much larger; most of the additional buildings burned down during the civil war in 1336. Originally, the pond's beach stretched up to the Uji River, with mountains on the opposite side of the river as a background. The entire scenic area encompassing the temple was a representation of the Western Paradise (or Pure Land) on earth. Today, the Phoenix Hall is virtually all that remains and Byodoin is one of the few examples of Heian temple architecture left in Japan. Japan has commemorated the longevity and cultural significance of
Byodoin by displaying its image on the 10 yen coin. The Phoenix Hall, the great statue of Amida inside it, and several other items at Byodoin are Japanese National Treasures.
And it's not just Japan that cherishes this temple. A full-size replica of Byodoin was built in 1968 at the Valley of the Temples on O'ahu, Hawaii. In December 1994, UNESCO listed the building as a World
Heritage Site.'




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From wiki:
"Nishi Honganji was established in 1602 by the Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu when he split the main Honganji in Kyoto in two (Higashi Honganji being the other) in order to diminish its power.[1]  Nishi Hongangi is located on Horikawa St. west of Higashi Honganji temple. It is older than the latter and has more integral architecture.[1] It is also listed as one of the Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto as a UNESCO World Heritage Site."

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