Holiday Inn Express Farmington (Bloomfield)

Address: 2110 Bloomfield Highway, Farmington, New Mexico, 87401, United States | 2 star motel
 
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Location

This 2 star motel, located on 2110 Bloomfield Highway, Farmington, is near Pinon Hills Golf Course, Farmington Museum, Aztec Museum and Pioneer Village, and B-Square Ranch.
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      TravelPod Member ReviewsHoliday Inn Express Farmington (Bloomfield)

      Reviewed by irloyal

      Great Place for Business

      Reviewed Jan 7, 2011
      by (3 reviews) Dallas , United States Flag of United States

      We stayed here using Priority points. Small and new H/I Express. Good for business, or a base of operations for sightseeing or an overnight stay. Small indoor pool and Jacuzzi. Breakfast bar was ho-hum. Staff was pleasant

      This review is the subjective opinion of a TravelPod member and not of TravelPod.com.

      TripAdvisor Reviews Holiday Inn Express Farmington (Bloomfield)

      4.00 of 5 stars Excellent
       

      Travel Blogs from Farmington

      A long and winding road = 126

      A travel blog entry by twofortheroad on Feb 19, 2013

      5 comments, 6 photos

      ... would say that it was butte-iful, but I would not lessen myself for the easy pun like that ("rocked it", though, was hilarious).
      There was even a heart-racing moment during my climb to the top that I had to lean out and balance myself between a two parallel rock faces over a crevice with a 40-50 foot drop.

      As intense as climbing Tucamcari was, it was not as white-knuckled as HWY 126. Without going into too much of ...

      Dirt Roads and Wildflowers!

      A travel blog entry by tuffychloe on Jul 28, 2012

      18 photos

      ... Durango, we went to the Bar D Wranglers Chuckwagon! We used to go at least once a summer, but we haven't been for several years. It was great to be back! The food is absolutely delicious, and the show is also great! Before the show, everyone gets in line to get beef or chicken, beans, baked potato, applesauce, biscuit, and spice cake piled on their plates, with a cup of lemonade or water to drink. If ...

      Night 23: Up America's Stairs

      A travel blog entry by splencner on Jul 12, 2012

      15 photos

      ... Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument. The term "Escalante" refers to the way that the land as it transitions from the depths of the Grand Canyon to the heights of the Colorado Plateau rises in a series of steps like a staircase. Of course, only a giant would notice this. We are mere ants in this scale. The Vermillions are the second or third "step" up from the Canyon. Sometimes you could see higher cliffs in the background. As we drew closer to the Colorado River, ...

      Ruins, a Shiprock, and the Animas River

      A travel blog entry by scoonpooh on Jul 23, 2011

      18 photos

      ... which gave us all the info we needed to understand the place and how it was built. Compared to other ruins in the world, this is not the most impressive place. But considering the advancement of the Native Americans, this was amazing. We walked inside some of the buildings – very rare in Native American ruins, and the doors were even small for Pooh. It about killed me trying to stoop over that low to get through. The Great Kiva that was reconstructed was the main ...

      Navajo Nation

      A travel blog entry by pat_maggie on May 27, 2011

      3 photos

      ... only costs $3 a person to view. After the obligatory picture of Pat standing in four states at one time, I indulged my tummy with my first taste of Navajo fry bread. This is truly a delicacy that came about through tragedy. Navajo fry bread actually evolved in the mid-19th century. Beginning in 1860, approximately 8,000 Navajos spent four years imprisoned at fort Summer, New Mexico and were given little more than ...