Tryp Mahdia Palace

Address: Mahdia, 5100, Tunisia | Hotel
 
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Location

This hotel is located in Mahdia.
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TripAdvisor Reviews Tryp Mahdia Palace

4.00 of 5 stars Excellent
 

Travel Blogs from Mahdia

Fantastic

A travel blog entry by jefehenk on Feb 06, 2015

1 comment, 3 photos

... at El Jem today. It was amazing! That's now two Roman stadium and/or coliseums I've visited in the past week. This one had gladiator battles and Christian executions and could seat 35,000 people. It is one of the most intact coliseums and about the fourth ...

Mahdia, Tunisia Fact Sheet

A travel blog entry by fais4 on Jan 11, 2015

... Current Leader(s) / Party(s): Mehdi Jomaa (Prime Minister), Moncef Marzouki (President)
Ethnicities (% breakdown): 98% Arab Berber, 1% European, 1% Jewish and Other
National Language(s): Arabic (Tunisian Arabic), French, Berber
Religion(s) practiced (% practiced): Muslim (Sunni) 99.1%, other 1% (includes Christian, Jewish, Shia Muslim, Baha’i)
Traditional ...

Monastir, Monastary, Pretty Similar in the End

A travel blog entry by cadkinsca on Oct 14, 2013

24 photos

... dirty, stray animals, crumbling in parts, chaos in the streets, and watch where you walk. A country where you have to make sure to carry your own toilet paper - never a good sign. The first night, Tunisia was playing Cameroon in a World Cup qualifying match. It was an exciting 0-0 tie, but at least people were out not drinking. I had a decent meal, but everything was closed by 10:00 p.m. The second night was even slower without the game.

...

Bye bye Bourguiba

A travel blog entry by tonyhudson on Aug 11, 2012

13 photos

... Josh and Grace headed into the Medina to do some shopping and buy refreshments.

Ribat ribat
The ribat, whilst built as a fortification, also became a religious centre and was for some time a place of pilgrimage.

It was erected in 796 AD and has been enlarged several times making it probably one of the largest surviving ribats in North Africa. It was enlarged on the north side ...

Return to El Jem again...

A travel blog entry by tonyhudson on Aug 11, 2012

12 photos

... making it one of the largest venues in Roman times with only the Flavian amphitheatre in Rome (50,000) and theatre of Campus having greater capacity.


The amphitheatre is a complex structure, but it has been well preserved and unaltered. Underneath the arena there are two passageways, which we explore, where gladiators would have waited with animals and slaves before being brought into the arena. Since there was no readily ...

Other places to stay in Mahdia