Hotel Ping Pong

Address: Lungomare P. Toscanelli 84, Lido di Ostia, Lazio, 00122, Italy | 3 star hotel
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This 3 star hotel, located in the Lido di Ostia area of Lido di Ostia, is near Real Rome Tours, Ostia Antica, and Rome Connection.
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    TripAdvisor Reviews Hotel Ping Pong Lido di Ostia

    3.50 of 5 stars Very Good

    Travel Blogs from Lido di Ostia

    A day at the beach

    A travel blog entry by sbbwebsters on May 18, 2014

    2 comments, 5 photos

    ... Briana Well, today was probably the most relaxing day we have had so far. Since it is our last day in Rome and we needed a relaxing day, we went to the beach. The beach was called Ostia Lido, just like Briana said up there. I should have written first because now it won't be as interesting, since we both did the same thing at the same time. We took the Metro, then we rode on another train for about a half an hour. We were lucky ...

    Rome: uncovering the secrets

    A travel blog entry by helenypsmith on May 11, 2014

    12 photos

    ... her name to have been Margherita. There was much rolling of eyes at our ignorance, but grinning all round when everyone finally got the message. We also passed many other official buildings which were very disparagingly referred to as "a disgrace!" Their government buildings, the justice building, the palaces of presidents etc. This was because of what goes on inside rather than the building. One building though, was described with great scorn. It was a marble building that ...

    Day 17 - Rome

    A travel blog entry by bss-tour-2013 on Dec 08, 2013

    51 photos

    ... It was composed of three superimposed arcades with an attic on top of a podium. Below ground subterranean passages were used to bring men and animals into the arena. The tiered seating areas could hold up to 50,000 spectators. The amphitheatre was used for public spectacles: mythological dramas, re-enactments of land and sea battles, animal hunts, public executions and, of course, the famous gladiators. Although popular belief states that early Christians were martyred here, it ...

    Walking through Roma

    A travel blog entry by everso on May 30, 2013

    57 photos

    ... wandering around it, tying to imagine the gladiator fights and the animal hunts. When we finished, we grabbed some lunch and headed over to the Trevi fountain. We didn't think ahead, and only had a euro to throw in (we should have saved a penny!) apparently, about 3000€ are thrown into the fountain each day! Legend says that if you throw a coin in, it will insure your return to the city. See you soon Rome! We took a walk from there to the Spanish steps, where ...

    Coming Home

    A travel blog entry by robertiz on Oct 08, 2012

    ... more comfortable seats and better movies. Our seats were closer to the front of the plane. Lauri napped on and off. I watched the tube and caught up on this blog. When Lauri was awake we talked about what we loved best in each place we stayed, breakfast in the Piazza San Marco and the gondola ride in Venice, lunch in Monterosso in the Cinque Terras, damn near everything in Tuscany, and the Segway tour in Rome. When we go back, and we will go ...