Le Cottage

Address: 24, avenue du General Leclerc, Cabourg, Basse-Normandie, Normandy, FR - 14390, France | 2 star hotel
Searching for availability...
*Prices above are provided by partners for one room, double occupancy and do not include all taxes and fees. Please see our partners for full details.
 

Location

This 2 star hotel, located on 24, avenue du General Leclerc, Cabourg, is near Sword Beach.
Map this hotel

Amenities

       

    TripAdvisor Reviews Le Cottage Cabourg

    3.50 of 5 stars Very Good
     

    Travel Blogs from Cabourg

    In Normandy

    A travel blog entry by legachicago on Oct 08, 2014

    6 comments

    ... guys to land on Normandy beach were the Rangers. There is a monument dedicated to them in the shape of a dagger. When I asked the tour guide what it was, she explained the dagger to me, but then also mentioned, oh by the way it is also a very phallic symbol - represents men,s might! She had a sense of humor even if she never stopped takling.

    The next stop for me I loved was Omaha beach. It is beautiful setting. The beach goes on for miles ...

    Normandy beaches, D-Day Landing.

    A travel blog entry by boomermaxwell on Oct 05, 2014

    7 photos

    ... Coffee overlooking the harbour. The Allies towed huge concrete blocks across the Channel and created an artificial "Mulberry Harbour" here at Arromanche-les-Bains. Lunch on a headland, then on to Omaha Beach( there were 5 areas of beach landings, named Sword, Omaha, Juno, Gold and Utah.) Finally the American War Cemetery, where over 9000 military are buried. Good displays and films again, so we ...

    Another day of history

    A travel blog entry by kev-buxton on Oct 03, 2014

    6 photos

    ... Horsa Bridge, formerly known as Ranville Bridge, the bridges were at important strategic locations linking a peninsular between the Caen Canal and the River Orne. The bridges were to be captured intact to allow British Forces to exit eastwards from their landing on Sword Beach later in the day.

    The events make riveting reading. On the night of 5th June, 1944, 181 soldiers flew from Southern England in six ...

    Je suis fatigue - I'm pooped!

    A travel blog entry by susannarachel on Jul 08, 2014

    11 photos

    ... the man that built it in the 16th century built it as a hunting lodge, built a church and then the village grew up around. Kept it in his family until there were no more heirs, so it was sold. During WWII it was used as a German military hospital and in 1977 it had fallen into disrepair with the owner unable financially to maintain it. It was sold then to an American - a soldier who had come there a week after D-Day, called Malcolm Forbes, the founder of ...

    Bonjour from Bayeux

    A travel blog entry by tk2014 on May 06, 2014

    4 comments, 5 photos

    ... he lives and breathes this stuff and you could feel the passion he holds for the story. Walking in holes created by dropped US shells, standing alongside and inside German bunkers complete with the original weaponry was spine tingling and the visit to the US cemetery was the most humbling of experiences as we glanced over 9000 graves of some very very young men. Another advantage of small towns is that ...