Mahdia Palace Thalasso

Address: PB 134 Touristic Zone, Mahdia, 5100, Tunisia | 5 star hotel
 
Searching for availability...
*Prices above are provided by partners for one room, double occupancy and do not include all taxes and fees. Please see our partners for full details.
 

How has this hotel rated in the past?

  What's this?
Discover trends in hotel experiences based on real traveler reviews and ratings. Mouse over circles to see what some travelers had to say.

Location

This 5 star hotel is located on PB 134 Touristic Zone, Mahdia.
Map this hotel

Amenities

       

    TripAdvisor Reviews Mahdia Palace Thalasso

    4.00 of 5 stars Excellent
     

    Travel Blogs from Mahdia

    Fantastic

    A travel blog entry by jefehenk on Feb 06, 2015

    1 comment, 3 photos

    ... at El Jem today. It was amazing! That's now two Roman stadium and/or coliseums I've visited in the past week. This one had gladiator battles and Christian executions and could seat 35,000 people. It is one of the most intact coliseums and about the fourth ...

    Mahdia, Tunisia Fact Sheet

    A travel blog entry by fais4 on Jan 11, 2015

    ... Couscous - most famous dish served with meat or fish and tomato sauce, Grilled Fish - a wide variety of seafood in Tunisia
    Traditional Dress Descriptions: A Jebba for men (a sleeveless tunic worn over a shirt) or trousers and a shirt for simple days, A Sefsari for women (a white veil covering head) with a blouse and flowy pants
    Famous Sites of Country: El Djem ...

    Bye bye Bourguiba

    A travel blog entry by tonyhudson on Aug 11, 2012

    13 photos

    ... President of the Republic of Tunisia from July 1957 to November 1987. In 1934, at the age of 31, he co-founded the Neo Destour party which spearheaded the Tunisian movement for independence from France. Despite being arrested and exiled a number of times he continued to pursue a nationalist agenda. Following the country's independence on the 20th of March 1956, Bourguiba abolished the monarchy, ...

    Jewel of the desert

    A travel blog entry by tonyhudson on Aug 03, 2012

    ... built, Thysdrus rivaled Hadrumetum (modern Sousse) as the second city of Roman North Africa, after Carthage. However, following the abortive revolt that began there in 238 AD, and Gordian I's suicide in his villa near Carthage, Roman troops loyal to the Emperor Maximinus Thrax destroyed the city. It never really recovered and today it is still a sleepy outpost - which makes the amphitheatre even more stunning - set against a backdrop of sparse low rise ...

    Exploring Sousse

    A travel blog entry by tonyhudson on Aug 02, 2012

    21 photos

    ... and other worldliness.

    Commissioned by Abou el Abbas Mohammed in 850AD from the oustide the Grand Mosque has a fortress like appearance and is devoid of the typical tall minaret tower which is used by the müezzin to call the faithfull to prayer. Later, in the 11th century, a domed building was added and this continues to serve as the minaret. The courtyard is paved with simple slabs separated by rows of broken paving set in the ...