Mahdia Palace Thalasso

Address: PB 134 Touristic Zone, Mahdia, 5100, Tunisia | 5 star hotel
 
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Location

This 5 star hotel is located on PB 134 Touristic Zone, Mahdia.
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    TripAdvisor Reviews Mahdia Palace Thalasso

    4.00 of 5 stars Excellent
     

    Travel Blogs from Mahdia

    Fantastic

    A travel blog entry by jefehenk on Feb 06, 2015

    1 comment, 3 photos

    ... at El Jem today. It was amazing! That's now two Roman stadium and/or coliseums I've visited in the past week. This one had gladiator battles and Christian executions and could seat 35,000 people. It is one of the most intact coliseums and about the fourth ...

    Mahdia, Tunisia Fact Sheet

    A travel blog entry by fais4 on Jan 11, 2015

    ... Carthage, the Bardo, Grand Erg Oriental
    Country Population (most current available) 10,937,521
    Country Population in 1900: N/A
    Average Life Expectancy of Males: 73.6 Females: 77.7
    National Unemployment Rate: 15.20%
    Country Literacy Rate: 79.1%
    Country Murder Rate: N/A
    Crude Birth Rate: 17.4
    Crude Death Rate: 5.7
    National Infant Mortality Rate: 14
    ...

    Bye bye Bourguiba

    A travel blog entry by tonyhudson on Aug 11, 2012

    13 photos

    ... to develop around him. The end of his rule was marked by his declining health, the rise of clientelism and Islamism. He died in April 2000.

    The impressive entrance gates of the monument open onto a paved courtyard or drive which leads to the Mausoleum. The mausoleum itself is flanked by twin minarets and surmounted with a guilt cupola. Habib Bourguiba is encased in a relatively ...

    Jewel of the desert

    A travel blog entry by tonyhudson on Aug 03, 2012

    ... built, Thysdrus rivaled Hadrumetum (modern Sousse) as the second city of Roman North Africa, after Carthage. However, following the abortive revolt that began there in 238 AD, and Gordian I's suicide in his villa near Carthage, Roman troops loyal to the Emperor Maximinus Thrax destroyed the city. It never really recovered and today it is still a sleepy outpost - which makes the amphitheatre even more stunning - set against a backdrop of sparse low rise ...

    Exploring Sousse

    A travel blog entry by tonyhudson on Aug 02, 2012

    21 photos

    ... It slopes towards a central drain which collects rainwater in an underground cistern. A colonade surrounds the courtyard and offers some protection from the sun.

    After taking a few photographs we walk to the nearby Ribat.


    Ribat
    Constructed in 821 AD the Ribat was one of a series of fortified monasteries which were built along the North African coast by the Aghlabids against the Christians marauders from nearby ...