Palace Hotel (Wang Fu Hotel)

Address: No.9 Yigu Street, Nanmen Street, Gucheng District, Lijiang, Yunnan, 674100, China | 4 star hotel
 
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Location

This 4 star hotel, located in the Gucheng District area of Lijiang, is near Black Dragon Pond Park, Baisha Village, and Museum of Nàxi Dongba Culture.
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Amenities

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      TravelPod Member ReviewsPalace Hotel (Wang Fu Hotel) Lijiang

      Reviewed by 2013

      Quaint Lijiang Hotel

      Reviewed May 16, 2013
      by (3 reviews) Brisbane , Australia Flag of Australia

      What a beautiful hotel to enjoy the old Lijiang style of building with modern amenities and service. Delightful stay. Would recommend to anyone for comfort and charm.

      This review is the subjective opinion of a TravelPod member and not of TravelPod.com.

      TripAdvisor Reviews Palace Hotel (Wang Fu Hotel) Lijiang

      4.00 of 5 stars Excellent
       

      Travel Blogs from Lijiang

      Tiger Leaping Gorgeousness

      A travel blog entry by nikhil.sharma on Nov 22, 2014

      9 photos

      ... from one rung to the next. It would have been a really embarrassingly stupid way to die.


      Relieved to be off the ladder we dragged our weary legs up the rest of the cliff face and were delighted to get back to a cafe for some lunch before taking the bus back to Lijiang.


      Back in Lijiang we were happy to see Tom and Owen (another friend we had made whilst in Guilin at Dragon’s Backbone) at the guest house who had been waiting for us so we could all ...

      Return to the city

      A travel blog entry by kreynolds89 on Oct 27, 2014

      2 comments, 22 photos

      ... covered with what were clearly frequent rock falls and the number of accidents that we came across, one of which was really serios. Our driver was not good, but we made it back in one piece. The guesthouse for the night was nice, and Lijiang was a nice town, but it contained the usual tourist rubbish, shops and stalls and was busy, crowded and noisy. I'm so glad that we made a break from the group and stayed in Tiger Leaping Gorge for two nights. The others have all had three nights ...

      Off road - Chinese style

      A travel blog entry by kreynolds89 on Oct 25, 2014

      1 comment, 16 photos

      ... and easily. We travelled off the superhighway today and the first part of the uphill journey was on very rough road, although it soon improved again. The hillsides are covered with fantastic terracing for rice and tea plants and family tombs, all offering stunning views. As we drove along there were several stone mason producing these tombs. Lunch was at a roadside restaurant in ...

      Tiger Leaping Gorge

      A travel blog entry by wellesbourne on Jun 24, 2014

      16 photos

      ... very nice. Afterwards we had a long drive to see a Naxi bell that commemorates a famous Naxi victory. From there to a monument commemorating the Red Army and their Long March. The march came through Yunnan and the locals helped them cross the Yangtze. We also think we went there because the area produces very famous watermelons and the driver wanted some! We also saw the first bend of the Yangtze. It is one of three main rivers and it is the ...

      Finding part of the beast - Elephant Hill

      A travel blog entry by happysheep on Mar 19, 2007

      1 comment, 3 photos

      ... in their extermination, but climate change also contributed to their demise as temperatures cooled in the first millennium BC. By this time elephants were no longer used in warfare, except in the west and southwest, although the last known use of war-elephants was as late as 1662 when they were commandeered from non-Han locals in the course of anti-Manchu resistance in the southwest." According to WWF, only 30,000-40,000 wild Asian elephants survive today, mostly in ...