Palace Hotel (Wang Fu Hotel)

Address: No.9 Yigu Street, Nanmen Street, Gucheng District, Lijiang, Yunnan, 674100, China | 4 star hotel
 
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Location

This 4 star hotel, located in the Gucheng District area of Lijiang, is near Black Dragon Pond Park, Baisha Village, and Museum of Nàxi Dongba Culture.
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    TravelPod Member ReviewsPalace Hotel (Wang Fu Hotel) Lijiang

    Reviewed by 2013

    Quaint Lijiang Hotel

    Reviewed May 16, 2013
    by (3 reviews) Brisbane , Australia Flag of Australia

    What a beautiful hotel to enjoy the old Lijiang style of building with modern amenities and service. Delightful stay. Would recommend to anyone for comfort and charm.

    This review is the subjective opinion of a TravelPod member and not of TravelPod.com.

    TripAdvisor Reviews Palace Hotel (Wang Fu Hotel) Lijiang

    4.00 of 5 stars Excellent
     

    Travel Blogs from Lijiang

    Peaceful Shaxi

    A travel blog entry by lianerose on Jul 31, 2015

    7 photos

    ... of much of Yunnan during this time. The sculptures were very detailed and colourful, I don’t know if this is due to restoration or if the colour has stayed all these years. Either way it was interesting, the kingdom was Buddhist so some of the carvings were of Buddhist deities and there was even a sculpture of a vagina which apparently would be worshipped (and they would ask this statue for fertility). This is an unusual theme and ...

    Curved up rooves and jagged hills

    A travel blog entry by linda-and-rick on Jul 13, 2015

    6 comments, 32 photos

    ... and what we call a pearapple,cos it looks like an apple, but is juicy like a pear. Whether it's because toddlers don't wear nappies, so parents need to feel the 'I need the loo' wriggle, or just because the pavements are so bad, most babies and toddlers are carried, either in arms, or in a sling, or, occasionally, in a basket on the back. The slings used by Naxi women are embroidered and colourful, but most Chinese women use a manufactured sling. Children tend to be carried on ...

    Admin and Thanks

    A travel blog entry by linda-and-rick on Jul 12, 2015

    4 comments, 2 photos

    ... up a cargo ship from either Hong Kong or Taiwan. We considered this. It would mean obtaining a new Chinese visa, and looping back north again, but it sounded possible. They then offered us a Cruise ship, which is going from Singapore direct to Sydney, where Tom and Marie are currently living, but going in late November, a couple of months earlier than we'd envisaged. However, apart from being a Cruise ship, ...

    Day 2

    A travel blog entry by fokat on Sep 15, 2014

    10 photos

    ... followed by a traditional performance from the old Naxi Orchestra before we made our way back to our hotel, via the street they call "Bar Street" for a well earned sleep. Bar Street is a paradise for those who love clubbing. The night life here is so ethi g else. I've never seen anything like it anywhere. But then again, with my quiet and strict upbringing, I don't really have much to compare it with ...

    Death, the Naxi and The Castle

    A travel blog entry by happysheep on Mar 21, 2007

    5 photos

    ... your chopsticks upright into the rice, as this also imitates sticks of incense used around this time. Relatives and neighbours offer food to the deceased three times a day during this time. On the third day, the body is wrapped in a white turban and the 'bravest' person of the household or village takes some rice wine in his mouth and sprays it over the face of the deceased. This action is seen as an insult, but if there is no response, the lid of the coffin ...