Palace Hotel (Wang Fu Hotel)

Address: No.9 Yigu Street, Nanmen Street, Gucheng District, Lijiang, Yunnan, 674100, China | 4 star hotel
 
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Location

This 4 star hotel, located in the Gucheng District area of Lijiang, is near Black Dragon Pond Park, Baisha Village, and Museum of Nàxi Dongba Culture.
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Amenities

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      TravelPod Member ReviewsPalace Hotel (Wang Fu Hotel) Lijiang

      Reviewed by 2013

      Quaint Lijiang Hotel

      Reviewed May 16, 2013
      by (3 reviews) Brisbane , Australia Flag of Australia

      What a beautiful hotel to enjoy the old Lijiang style of building with modern amenities and service. Delightful stay. Would recommend to anyone for comfort and charm.

      This review is the subjective opinion of a TravelPod member and not of TravelPod.com.

      TripAdvisor Reviews Palace Hotel (Wang Fu Hotel) Lijiang

      4.00 of 5 stars Excellent
       

      Travel Blogs from Lijiang

      Tiger Leaping Gorgeousness

      A travel blog entry by nikhil.sharma on Nov 22, 2014

      9 photos

      ... the train. Our rather frustrating journey left us tired and feeling underprepared when we stepped out of the station at Lijiang. Fortunately everything quickly got a whole lot better!


      Our hostel was one of the most welcoming places we’ve been to yet. When we arrived several of the guests were just sitting down to dinner with Tom, the owner, and they shared their amazing food with us. Staying at October Inn with Tom felt like staying with a friend. We had a ...

      Return to the city

      A travel blog entry by kreynolds89 on Oct 27, 2014

      2 comments, 22 photos

      ... outside the guesthouse. We were able to take our time and enjoy the stunning scenery, not just of the gorge but also the countryside and the fields and village. It was a good walk down and back again and there was no one except locals about. Oh, except that we bumped into the crass Australian man who continued to make stupid comments. We had an interesting minivan ride back to Lijiang and was probably one of the worst trips I've ever had, not helped by the state of the road, ...

      Off road - Chinese style

      A travel blog entry by kreynolds89 on Oct 25, 2014

      1 comment, 16 photos

      ... us. A stunning sight and a lovely day travelling. We arrived in Lijiang just as it was getting dark and were immediately collected by a minivan which took us to Sean's Guesthouse in the heart of Tiger Leaping Gorge. We arrived about 9pm in total darkness and, as we got out of the van, saw a sight I haven't seen since Mongolia: a starry sky! No smog, no clouds, no traffic. It's ...

      Tiger Leaping Gorge

      A travel blog entry by wellesbourne on Jun 24, 2014

      16 photos

      ... very nice. Afterwards we had a long drive to see a Naxi bell that commemorates a famous Naxi victory. From there to a monument commemorating the Red Army and their Long March. The march came through Yunnan and the locals helped them cross the Yangtze. We also think we went there because the area produces very famous watermelons and the driver wanted some! We also saw the first bend of the Yangtze. It is one of three main rivers and it is the ...

      Finding part of the beast - Elephant Hill

      A travel blog entry by happysheep on Mar 19, 2007

      1 comment, 3 photos

      ... in their extermination, but climate change also contributed to their demise as temperatures cooled in the first millennium BC. By this time elephants were no longer used in warfare, except in the west and southwest, although the last known use of war-elephants was as late as 1662 when they were commandeered from non-Han locals in the course of anti-Manchu resistance in the southwest." According to WWF, only 30,000-40,000 wild Asian elephants survive today, mostly in ...