Huanchaco Hostal

Address: Victor Larco 287, Huanchaco, Peru | Hotel
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This hotel, located on Victor Larco 287, Huanchaco, is near Huanchaco Beach, El Brujo, Huacas de Moche, and Tres Chimbadas Lake.
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    TripAdvisor Reviews Huanchaco Hostal

    3.50 of 5 stars Very Good

    Travel Blogs from Huanchaco

    A plethora of amazonian animals

    A travel blog entry by yvan.huppe on Feb 27, 2015

    1 comment, 64 photos

    ... net and clearly not getting much sleep, I am glad our camp at least had a roof. There were plenty of "Jesus" lizards around, the ones than can run on water, and wow were they fast, I was able to only get the footprints they left behind on the water (ripples). We had a nice diner and set off again. I was so hot now, and I was very well shaded, we enjoyed the ride and got to witness many more animals, until we ...

    Not only stuffed animals

    A travel blog entry by daveanddale on Aug 13, 2014

    ... nice juices. The shop was tiny so we went to the main plaza to
    eat. After we headed to the travel agent expecting to meet our tour but the
    shop was closed for siesta, we thought. We sat waiting for over an hour and we
    were far from happy as the time past to be able to go. The shop finally opened
    and we arranged to do the tour tomorrow instead. We went to visit the sites
    around town we had planned to see tomorrow. The archaeological museum was very
    impressive and ...

    Pyramids, pyramids

    A travel blog entry by lyndsey-martin on Jun 06, 2014

    82 photos

    ... years ago.) The Huaca de Luna was seriously impressive; the pyramid was built gradually over hundreds of years, with the base built first, then, with each successive major natural disaster (drought, or earthquakes), the upper levels were built over and around the original base, as an offering to the Gods. This meant that each level was larger (at the base at least) and therefore largely covered the level below. This hid the wall drawings and motifs of each ...