The New Yorker / HOTEL

Address: Deutz-Mulheimer-Strasse 204, Cologne, North Rhine-Westphalia, 51063, Germany | 4 star hotel
 
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Location

This 4 star hotel, located in the Mülheim area of Cologne, is near Museum Ludwig, Claudius Therme, Wallraf-Richartz Museum, and Kolner Philharmonie.
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      TripAdvisor Reviews The New Yorker / HOTEL Cologne

      3.50 of 5 stars Very Good
       

      Travel Blogs from Cologne

      Bonn and Cruising to Amsterdam

      A travel blog entry by alexsandral on Apr 09, 2015

      42 photos

      ... at that particular pub. Friends and family members usually belong to the same drinking club. We saw Beethoven's birth place. On the outside of the house they have a plaque which says he was born on 17.12.1770, however that is the date of his baptism and his actual birthdate which would be shortly before that is unknown. Since the late 1800's the house has been a Beethoven Museum and research centre for his music. At 2:00 pm we sailed for Amsterdam ...

      Cologne............ Smells French !

      A travel blog entry by peterconnor on Mar 30, 2015

      4 comments, 4 photos

      ... about 900 years old and whereas The Aachen Cathedral is the oldest, this one is the largest in Northern Europe.

      It is so surreal to walk out of the door of the station and there it is. It is massive and something out of a Spielberg movie. I can only hope my photos capture what I am trying to describe.If you have read the historical fiction novels by Ken Follet in his Pillars of The Earth and World Without End, you can see why the building ...

      Day 2: Antwerp to Bonn (141 miles)

      A travel blog entry by kkma1387 on Mar 27, 2015

      12 photos

      ... century and became part of the first French Empire. During the Second World War Bonn was of strategic significance as it offered a defensive position on the Rhine to prevent invasion from the west. In 1945 Bonn was captured by the U.S. Army and following the Axis surrender was in British controlled territory until 1949 when it became the de facto capital of the newly formed People's Republic of Germany, although the capital de jure was Berlin, hence ...

      Deep in the history in Bonn

      A travel blog entry by want9814 on Mar 13, 2015

      19 photos

      ... s friends at a birthday party for their priest. That was awesome. A chance to enjoy the company of locals. The next day we moved to stay with Beate and Michael's daughter, Johanna in the city part of Bonn but that day we all spent together walking around the college town. It was the city where Beethoven was born and we got to walk by his house. We saw a beautiful old cathedral where Edith and Josef were married. We saw all the buildings used by the colleges and how carriage ...

      My Last Days in Germany

      A travel blog entry by travelink on Dec 12, 2014

      1 comment, 11 photos

      ... about a series of subjects―his family (wife had passed away last year), professions, my time in Germany, his relatives in the U.S. (Toledo and Philadelphia) and a bit of politics (U.S. and German). Afterwards I retrieved my luggage and took it to the lobby and paid my bill. I made the five
      minute walk to the bus stop, purchased my ticket and awaited the #201 bus to the train station, where I arrived about 30 minutes prior ...