Hotel Lal's Haveli

8892/95 Multani Dhanda, New Delhi, National Capital Territory of Delhi, 110055, India | 2 star hotel
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Location

This 2 star hotel, located in the Central Delhi area of New Delhi, is near Friday Mosque (Jama Masjid), National Gandhi Museum, Crafts Museum, and Delhi Golf Club (DGC).
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    TravelPod Member ReviewsHotel Lal's Haveli New Delhi

    Reviewed by c044646

    Secure, convenient and friendly

    Reviewed Jan 31, 2012
    by (7 reviews) Gifu , Japan Flag of Japan

    10 min walk to the main bazaar st. and New Delhi train station. Nice and cheap local restaurant around as well as their own rooftop restaurant. Relatively a bit more expensive than hotels in Main bazaar, but we are pretty satisfied with the service.

    This review is the subjective opinion of a TravelPod member and not of TravelPod.com.

    TripAdvisor Reviews Hotel Lal's Haveli New Delhi

    4.00 of 5 stars Excellent
     

    Travel Blogs from New Delhi

    Mastering the Metro

    A travel blog entry by benjandkori on Sep 20, 2014

    1 comment, 8 photos

    ... The women are free to travel in the men's carriages if they wish but not many do. Even in the men's carriages, there are special seats reserved for ladies, the elderly or the 'differently abled'. It seems that for many women, the metro has made it safe for them to travel alone in Delhi. The first stop was The Red Fort (which we have included photos of). It was a fascinating place with so much history. ...

    Old and New Delhi

    A travel blog entry by richmiketrav on Jan 27, 2014

    ... here to pay their respects. It was a simple place but probably more elaborate that he would have liked, and it was being prepared for some celebration, I think of his birthday. Then came the world's tallest freestanding masonry tower at Qutab Minar. The site of the first mosque in Delhi, I think, it is now an area of ruins which even after explanation was difficult to understand. Lots of the supporting columns had been taken from local Hindu temples, the ...

    Open Wide!

    A travel blog entry by tnaworldtour on Dec 25, 2013

    2 comments, 3 photos

    ... guy” and “I have a camel that could give you a ride there for a good price.” He even had dental connections in Connecticut for us when we eventually return to the States. In true Indian form, everyone knows somebody that can assist you. A genuine desire to help you while jointly benefiting a relative or friend of theirs monetarily is evident, but we never really know who's receiving a commission in the middle and at what rate.

    Along the same ...

    Indian Religions and Delhi Golf

    A travel blog entry by ryan.diplock on Nov 05, 2013

    12 photos

    ... temples built between holes…completely normal. At a certain point I began to feel weird telling a 40 year old man to hold my sand wedge….we had struck up a decent conversation at this point and had discussed his family, his golf handicap, and how he had worked at the club for over 25 years as a caddy. I began to ask myself; have I worked harder in my life than this man? Why do I get to hand him the golf club instead of vice versa? This prompted me to propose ...

    DAY 3: Stroll around the city

    A travel blog entry by melodyalmario on Jun 10, 2013

    9 photos

    ... very popular Indian street food. It is spicy and at the same time salty, two good combination yum! Lastly, another street food we got to taste was Poori (Puri), a fried bread that is enjoyed by many in India. It consists of simply flour, salt and water to make. You can use either atta (whole wheat flour), maida (refined wheat flour), or sooji (coarse wheat flour). The name puri derives from the Sanskrit word पूरिक ...