Hotel La Truffiere

Address: RN (Route Nationale) 20, Gignac, Gignac, Midi-Pyrénées, 46600 , France | Hotel
 
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*Prices above are provided by partners for one room, double occupancy and do not include all taxes and fees. Please see our partners for full details.
 

Location

This hotel, located on RN (Route Nationale) 20, Gignac, Gignac, is near Chemin de fer touristique du Haut Quercy - Train a vapeur de Martel.
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TripAdvisor Reviews Hotel La Truffiere Gignac

3.50 of 5 stars Very Good
 

Travel Blogs from Gignac

The beautiful Beaulieu-sur-Dordogne

A travel blog entry by anothertrip on Oct 29, 2014

1 comment, 5 photos

We were looking forward to returning to this part of rural France, and we weren't disappointed. The narrow streets winding past old stone houses, and the Dordogne River, calm and peaceful until the small wall, where the water tumbled over it. The fine, warm weather certainly made the experience perfect.
We had booked a hotel, but when we tried to check-in we found it was shut until 5.00pm. (It was stated on our email that check-in was from 4.00pm, but all the hotels ...

I'm not a caveman! I'm a troglodyte!

A travel blog entry by beandip on Oct 14, 2014

3 comments, 5 photos

... s an enormous cliff and if you saw it, you'd think nothing of it. This cliff has been lived on for 55,000 years by the Neanderthals and the Cro Mangons but it was busiest in the Middle Ages when people actually built houses on it! There was a church, a butchery and a smoke house! During Viking raids, villagers would use winches to haul their animals (who would pasture down below) up, pull up their ladders and get ready to defend! ...

The Dordogne River Valley & Castlenaud

A travel blog entry by bstokesdenver on Oct 07, 2014

9 photos

... Although they never fought head to head. The English ruled Aquitaine after Eleanor of Aquitaine married Henry II, King of England. The castle owners always seemed to be on the losing side of every conflict. The earliest record is in the 13th century when Simon de Montfort took it from the Cathar Bernard de Casnac who eventually took it back. During the Hundred Years War it was loyal to the Plantagenets (British) ...

Visiting Prehistoric Caves

A travel blog entry by bstokesdenver on Oct 06, 2014

4 photos

... leads archeologists to believe they were intelligent capable people living in a primitive time. Some of the earliest humans moved north from Africa to Europe and ended up on France. The “Madeleine” people lived here at the end of the ice age around 17,000 years ago (BP). For some unknown reason they went deep into natural caves to paint and carve pictures into the rock. There is no evidence they ever lived that deep ...

Neanderthal & Cro-Magnon Territory

A travel blog entry by twodrifters07 on Oct 06, 2014

31 photos

... prehistoric sites, but, due to the French's love of lunchtime closures, our timing seemed wrong all around! We arrived in Les Eyzies just in time for the museum's noon closure, so we drove the road north to the Grotte du Grand Roc and Abris de Laugerie which were also closed for lunch, but we could hike along the road and see the amazing huge rocks resting on top ...