Hotel Cabana Quinta

Address: Jr. Moquegua 422, Puerto Maldonado, Peru | Hotel
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This hotel, located on Jr. Moquegua 422, Puerto Maldonado, is near Lago Sandoval, Butterfly Farm, Jungle Nature Hikes, and Inkaterra Ecological Reserve.
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    TravelPod Member ReviewsHotel Cabana Quinta Puerto Maldonado

    Reviewed by hanspeter.bock

    Puerto Maldonado

    Reviewed May 12, 2012
    by (12 reviews) Ko Phangan , Thailand Flag of Thailand

    It was rainy time in Puerto Maldonado and I just came out of the cold in the mountains of Cusco. So i decided to take a nice hotel with a little pool to relax and get used to the tropical climate now down here in the Peruvian Amazon Basin. The town is quite, nice laying on the large Rio Madre de los Dios, surrounded of indigenous villages in the jungle.
    I liked the quit hotel, there is a big and tasty breakfast buffet, not much people on this time and the pool I shared with some kids from a Cusco Family in holiday. A good place to be and moderate price.

    This review is the subjective opinion of a TravelPod member and not of

    TripAdvisor Reviews Hotel Cabana Quinta Puerto Maldonado

    3.50 of 5 stars Very Good

    Travel Blogs from Puerto Maldonado

    Lake Sandoval

    A travel blog entry by ngairephillips on Oct 23, 2015

    2 comments, 6 photos

    ... lake proper. And what a lake! The wet-footed palms lined much of the near shore, while less wet- tolerant species occupied the drier reaches. As our boatman and guide paddled the 3km stretch to our lodge we were treated to a close-up introduction to the resident giant otter family. Repeatedly bobbing their heads above water to check for dangers or to consume fish, the 8 or so family members appeared rather comical. At almost 2m in length this species is amongst ...

    Welcome to the jungle

    A travel blog entry by aletouze on Oct 18, 2015

    1 comment, 42 photos

    ... from her deck and when she went to get it, a bushmaster snake bit her in the face, and she died... Another time, Mirco told us how he placed a wasp nest into his friend's backpack while hiking in the jungle, just for fun.

    Unfortunately for Mirco, he could not find any snakes to show us. He did find many tarantulas though! We saw lots of things in the jungle, these included: tarantulas (did I mention that already?), caimans (South ...

    Amazon Adventure

    A travel blog entry by ridgewell51 on Oct 13, 2015

    1 comment, 14 photos

    ... flight covered with slippery gravel. Of course this was where the rope hand rail was low and loose. Once at the top we faced a 15 minute walk which normally would be okay but the path was wet and muddy if you stepped off the single row of small hexagonal pavers. It got harder to see these as it became darker and there were no overhead lights. Anyway we all made it. There were 15 of us on the boat but 6 were a separate group so really only 9 in our ...

    Sandoval Lodge the Amazon

    A travel blog entry by julianait on Sep 22, 2015

    17 photos

    ... trip notes was just an hour informative walk on the local vegetation and wildlife.  Back to the lodge for a rest and lunch. After lunch saw a great opportunity for a siesta to catch up on some badly needed sleep and to prepare for another tour on the lake to try and spot some otters and Caymen. Our group of 9 went first class on the roomy makeshift raft while the other group of 14 retirees, whom we referred to as the 'old people', had to squash into ...

    In the heart of the Rainforest.

    A travel blog entry by danbob15 on Sep 12, 2015

    9 comments, 10 photos

    ... two didn't stop there...we then went for a visit to a local turtle rescue project where they rescue eggs from the riverbanks and nest them until they hatch and are then returned to the river. After this, we strolled onto the local farm attached to the rescue centre and saw all manner of fruits. Did you know a pineapple grows from a plant - each only bearing one fruit? I didn't, and it only kind of made me really hope for a nearby bar serving ice cold ...