Hotel Las Orquideas

Address: Avda Ferrocarril s/n, Ollantaytambo, Sacred Valley, Peru | Hotel
 
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Location

This hotel, located on Avda Ferrocarril s/n, Ollantaytambo, is near Hot Springs (Aguas Calientes) and Pisac Market.
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Amenities

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          TravelPod Member ReviewsHotel Las Orquideas Ollantaytambo

          Reviewed by eddim

          Cheerful spot to relaz and catch your breath

          Reviewed Oct 2, 2013
          by (45 reviews) Toronto , Canada Flag of Canada

          Stayed here with a tour group and the staff were very accommodating as we had to leave our big bags here while on the Inca trail. Rooms are cheerful and clean with wonderful down filled duvets. Just the thing for the cold Peruvian nights!. I would stay here again.

          This review is the subjective opinion of a TravelPod member and not of TravelPod.com.

          TripAdvisor Reviews Hotel Las Orquideas Ollantaytambo

          3.50 of 5 stars Very Good
           

          Travel Blogs from Ollantaytambo

          Harry Surives the Inca Trail, but now Hates Steps

          A travel blog entry by harry.harrison on Nov 07, 2015

          ... the team. I slept better on day two, in spite of the fairly cramped tent, such was my knackeredness. Knackerdity. Or some word to that effect.

          Day three was an easy peasy half day, again relatively. A serious walk, but after the struggles of day two it felt like a light walk. That afternoon we visited the impressive ruins of Winay Wayna, close to our campsite. Another terraced hillside town, of the style favoured by the Incas. Our guide Wilfredo explained how the ...

          Bye bye hikers...hello Cusco...again

          A travel blog entry by lizrosa on Oct 30, 2015

          18 photos

          ... we continued through to Moray. In Moray we visited the Inca agricultural greenhouse or laboratory, at an altitude of 3,500 meters, consisting of four platforms, amphitheater style, at a depth of 150 meters. The overlapping concentric circular stone rings widen as they rise. It was an experimental place to study the adaptation of plants to new ecosystems. Each platform has several terraces which have a ...

          Machu Picchu!

          A travel blog entry by chrisphil on Sep 26, 2015

          1 comment, 25 photos

          ... fun, they are so gentle! And we went back up once more for a final view and final pictures before the sun dissapears behind the mountains, and the guards guide everybody out.

          Phew! What a day! We stayed almost 11 hours on the site, climbing up and down, up the moutain as well, we were rather tired by the end of the day.

          One very long day is the minimum that one has to do. Two days would definitely be better, to absorb everything, all the sights, all ...

          Journey to the Sun Gate - Machu Picchu

          A travel blog entry by srandac2015 on Sep 03, 2015

          4 comments, 17 photos

          ... mountains to the north creating an interesting and beautiful effect. We passed a small ruin named Runkuracay, a small semi-circular building thought to be a lookpoint due to its commanding views over the valley below. At Abra de Runkuracay (4000m) we had good views of a line of snow covered peaks off in the distance, though I can't remember their Spanish names. The path descended steeply down to the ruins of Sayacmarca, meaning inaccessible town that was protected on three ...

          Story time!

          A travel blog entry by katiehallberg on Aug 22, 2015

          43 photos

          ... not touch the Spaniards. They were able to move freely about the city. In this time, they increase their supplies, and turned many natives who were conquered by the Incans to betray them and join the Spaniards, so when the ransom was full filled, Pizarro killed Atahualpa and the war began. The Incans were forced to retreat to Ollantaytambo where they fought of the Spaniards for seven years but eventually retreated to ...