Surfside Hotel

Address: 3209 S Atlantic Ave, Daytona Beach, Florida, 32118-6225, United States | Hotel
 
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*Prices above are provided by partners for one room, double occupancy and do not include all taxes and fees. Please see our partners for full details.
 

Location

This hotel, located on 3209 S Atlantic Ave, Daytona Beach, is near Beach at Daytona Beach, Ponce Inlet, Ponce de Leon Inlet Lighthouse & Museum, and Lighthouse Point Park.
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Amenities

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Photos of Surfside Hotel

           

          Amenities

          Activities

          • Restaurant
          • Beach
          • Swimming pool
          • Outdoor pool
          • Heated pool
          • Fitness/Health center
          • Bar/lounge

          Features

          • Wireless internet connection in public areas
          • Reduced mobility rooms
          • Wireless internet connection in room (free)
          • Refrigerator in room
          • Hot tub
          • Non-smoking hotel
          • Microwave in room
          • High-speed internet in room
          • Air-Conditioning
          • Wheelchair accessibility
          • Free parking
          • Kitchenette
          • Pets allowed

          General

          • Suites
          • All-Suites Property

          Services

          • Continental Breakfast
          • Laundry facilities (self serve)
          • Banquet room
          • Business Services
           

          TripAdvisor Reviews Surfside Hotel Daytona Beach

          4.50 of 5 stars Outstanding
           

          Travel Blogs from Daytona Beach

          On the way to Daytona Beach

          A travel blog entry by nbarber on Oct 10, 2015

          1 photo

          Quiet this morning and I was up with the sun as my pancake mattress was a little uncomfortable. Packed up our tent after breakfast and was very well behaved as we did not make noise to wake up the neighbors, although I really did fancy getting a wooden spoon and dinging a saucepan outside their RV. We drove for 7 hours before we arrived at Daytona Beach due to road works. At one point In our journey we were behind a driver after Tallahassee and he was weaving and then went ...

          Day 16 - Biscayne Bay NP

          A travel blog entry by kurtvb on Oct 07, 2015

          2 photos

          After a final walk around Key West to some of the famous tourist spots - Hemingway's house, end of Hwy A1A, and a picture at the Southern Most point in the continental US (just 90 miles to Cuba), we hit the road north. A stop at Biscayne Bay NP was a nice stop, and again we seemed to have the park to ourselves. Most of this park is also underwater, but we saw a few videos at the visitors center, and walked along a few of the boardwalks. We saw a ...

          Day 15 - Monday Oct 5th

          A travel blog entry by kurtvb on Oct 07, 2015

          6 photos

          ... of this NP is underwater, it is well worth the visit. The history of the fort, the role it played in US history going back to the civil war, and the shear size and unbelievable construction of this building out in the middle of the ocean, made the visit very memorable. After 4 or so hours touring the fort, walking on deserted beaches and even a little snorkeling, we head back to Key West. Once we arrived back in Key West, we walked, shopped and ate (and ...

          Day 14 - Sunday October 4th

          A travel blog entry by kurtvb on Oct 07, 2015

          2 photos

          Florida, the Everglades, and Key West! It was an excellent day and it was almost surreal finally reaching Key West after all these days of driving and wonderful sights. First the Everglades. Not a swamp, but a very wide, slow moving river. Dropping about 14 feet over several 100 miles. It is the only place where both crocodiles and alligators live in the same environment. ...

          Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

          A travel blog entry by tendashseven on Feb 17, 2015

          3 comments, 35 photos

          ... in a canal on the other side of the road and as we exit the area, he decides to return to the water. It is rare that we see a gator walking, so I was really happy to capture this picture of this giant “El Lagarto”. Upon arriving at the New World, Spanish Explorers had never seen an Alligator before. There was no word for them. So they called them “El Lagarto” meaning “The Lizard”. This became the English word ...