Hidenoya

Address: 2-9 Chikumachi, Iida, Nagano Prefecture, Chubu, 395-0045, Japan | Hotel
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Location

This hotel is located on 2-9 Chikumachi, Iida.
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Travel Blogs from Iida

Hiking in Hakuba

A travel blog entry by paablo on Sep 02, 2014

9 photos

Matsumoto Day Two
Day trip from Matsumoto to Hakuba

Characters:

Alistair: House mate, friend and Anime enthusiast, with three prior visits to Japan under his belt, his sound understanding of Nihongo (Japanese Language) made him the Japanese Master.

David: My other friend and house mate who was far too tall for Japan, David was destined to hit his head on every low doorway. Dave's love of Shinkansen (bullet trains) had ...

The Battle of Sekigahara

A travel blog entry by cdavis0496 on Aug 03, 2014

3 comments, 30 photos

... scenes unless it's the anniversary of the battle. What you do get is a feeling of peace and tranquility. This is a quiet town with only small banners as a reminder that it was here that Japan's future changed from several warring states to a unified country.

Hahaha ok I'm stopping now before I turn this into an abstract for a dissertation. Next and last stop is Tokyo with Disney and Mt. Fuji as well.

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Old Japan

A travel blog entry by 12thousand500 on Jul 06, 2014

1 photo

... really not that complicated. First, we needed to take the Shinkansen--that's the bullet-train--to Nagoya, then transfer to an express, and then transfer to a local for the last fifteen minutes. The local was two cars, but basically its a subway with handholds. This dropped us about 2 miles from Tsumago. Only in Japan can you take a subway train to within 2 miles of some place that is basically the middle of nowhere.
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Ancient Cedars

A travel blog entry by wwoofers on May 31, 2014

1 comment, 43 photos

... tree justice but you get the idea. Around the tree there is a shrine and housing for the resident shinto monk. The shrine itself is simple but classic in its Japanese feel except for the somewhat unique statues that guard the temple. Instead of the traditional fox, the statues here represent wolves, a symbol of protection from wild boar and deer that often ravage fields even today. For farmers the wolf was one of the most important shrine symbols and ...

Confessions of a Sushi-holic

A travel blog entry by wwoofers on May 31, 2014

6 comments, 1 photo

... li>

  • Step 3: Head to the machine near the entrance to reserve a table, punch in how many members of your party and take the ticket that is issued, your number will appear on the computer monitor above the cash register and when it is time to be seated a table number will be added and your number called. Have a seat on the bench and wait until then. Thankfully all the other families waiting were very polite and there was plenty of room for our big ...