Aquila Atlantis Hotel

Address: 2 Ygias Str, Heraklion, Crete, 71202, Greece | 4 star hotel
 
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*Prices above are provided by partners for one room, double occupancy and do not include all taxes and fees. Please see our partners for full details.
 

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Location

This 4 star hotel, located on 2 Ygias Str, Heraklion, is near The Palace of Knossos, Iraklion Archaeological Museum, Ammoudara Beach, and Gournia.
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Amenities

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Photos of Aquila Atlantis Hotel

           

          Amenities

          Activities

          • Swimming pool
          • Restaurant
          • Bar/lounge

          Features

          • Free High-Speed Internet
          • Wheelchair accessibility
          • Free parking

          General

          • Suites

          Services

          • TV Channel One Russia
          • Continental Breakfast
          • Room service
          • Business Services
           

          TripAdvisor Reviews Aquila Atlantis Hotel Heraklion

          4.50 of 5 stars Outstanding
           

          Travel Blogs from Heraklion

          Heraklion Crete

          A travel blog entry by stevanlisa on Oct 19, 2015

          5 photos

          ... It's awesome and noisy and threatening and joyful. Our lives are golden. We get to take it all in. Five pizza delivery motos rotate in and out in front of us. Lots of duct tape keeping them running and all together. Just like our spinning globe. Don't know how it all stays together and don't care. As long as it does. Strange encounters of a genuine kind. Sandy. She a lovely young woman running the fruit and health food store a few doors ...

          Minoan time in Crete

          A travel blog entry by katherinecle on Oct 08, 2015

          24 photos

          ... hieroglyphics. Unfortunately no one has deciphered the inscriptions yet. The best guess is that it is a hymn or text of magic character. Bob thinks it is someone's life story.

          Another famous piece is the gold bee pendent from Malia, the 3rd largest Minoan city, which has been dated to between1800 to 1700 BC.

          It certainly doesn't appear that this level of sophistication in art and city life was duplicated for another 1,000 years on Crete.

          ...

          Cruisin' for a Bruisin': Part I

          A travel blog entry by blakekelsey on Oct 03, 2015

          1 comment, 67 photos

          ... of Santorini is the newly forming volcano, a separate island, which has erupted twice (minor eruptions) in the last 50 years.

          There isn't a place for big cruise ships to port directly on the island, so instead they do a tender, where small boats drive groups of tourists from the ship to the island. Blake, Rob, and I heard from some friends on the boat that there is a famous hike on the island from the town of Fira to Oia. Having no internet to do any major research of ...

          A generous Brit.

          A travel blog entry by os2015 on Sep 29, 2015

          13 photos

          ... storied building, spanning 5 1/2 acres, and was destroyed twice in its history, once from fire (roughly in 1700 BC), the second and later destruction from a major earthquake which ravaged Crete. Two factors are thought to have contributed to the end of the Minoan: the possible eruption of the volcano Thera and the rise of the Mycenean civilization upon Crete.
          English archaeologist, Sir Arthur John ...

          Knossos

          A travel blog entry by patelfamily on Jun 07, 2015

          3 photos

          ... Minotaur in. Today there isn't too much left of the palace. There are some parts of the palace still standing though, and, from what I saw, I think the palace would be really impressive. Unfortunately a British archeologist, Arthur Evans, in 1900 had started to excavate the ruins but he tried to recreate the palace how he thought it should be. Modern archeologists now think he got it wrong. Then we went back to the villa and packed our bags ready to leave ...