Grand Hotel Plaza

Address: Via del Corso 126, Rome, Lazio, 00186, Italy | 4 star hotel
 
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Location

This 4 star hotel, located in the Historic Center area of Rome, is near Via del Corso, Via Condotti, Augustus's Mausoleum (Mausoleo Augusteo), and East of Via del Corso.
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Amenities

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Photos of Grand Hotel Plaza

           

          Amenities

          Activities

          • Restaurant
          • Bar/lounge

          Features

          • Minbar in room
          • Breakfast Available
          • High-speed internet in room
          • Free High-Speed Internet
          • Wireless internet connection in room (free)
          • Smoking rooms available
          • Reduced mobility rooms
          • Wheelchair accessibility
          • Air-Conditioning
          • Pets allowed
          • Family rooms

          General

          • Suites

          Services

          • Room service
          • Conference facilities
          • TV Channel One Russia
          • Continental Breakfast
          • Business Services
          • Kids activities or Babysitting
           

          TripAdvisor Reviews Grand Hotel Plaza Rome

          3.00 of 5 stars Good
           

          Travel Blogs from Rome

          Colosseum you truly are colossal

          A travel blog entry by mikeandann on Oct 07, 2015

          2 comments, 15 photos

          ... Milan. He had a great sense of humour, I am sure spoke Italian with a Scots accent and an amazing passion and love for ancient Roman history. He also enjoyed dispelling the myths we have grown up with including the fact that very few Christians were actually killed in the Colosseum - that happened underneath where the Vatican is today!! I cannot even begin to describe the awe and thrill of seeing the Colosseum for the first time (which actually happened on our ...

          Rome Day 3

          A travel blog entry by jtate on Jan 12, 2015

          Today we made our way to the Vatican City. We had a tour booked so we didn't have to wait in the line. We met our tour guide Luigi who was literally an Italian version of Gary Muir. He was very passionate about his art. He showed us through the museum highlighting the first statue that was shown off by the Vatican. We learnt that the hardest bit of the body to sculpt was the knee. Getting the anatomy right showed just how good an artist you really were. After seeing a few ...

          Rome

          A travel blog entry by barb3389 on Oct 19, 2014

          12 photos

          ... The huge bronze doors with their beautiful sculptures are so perfectly hung that just 2 people can open and close them.

          We passed the wonderful Column dedicated to Marcus Aurelius with carvings marching all the way from bottom to top, describing his battle with the Germans. You can clearly see the centurions in their battle gear. There are stairs inside that go to the top, but I think they are closed...would be very claustrophobic anyway.

          From here ...

          Prego!

          A travel blog entry by healsby on Aug 27, 2014

          4 photos

          ... way to our hotel. Rome was busy, as expected, but we decided after about a minute and a half that it was already better than Naples! The hotel was a little on the shabby side, and the room was quite dark, but we were only there for long enough to do a load of laundry – hand luggage only for three weeks means this is a necessity! – and then we headed out into the city in the afternoon to have a look around.

          We grabbed ...

          Oh just going to the Pantheon for class.

          A travel blog entry by rome_aq on Nov 05, 2013

          ... has a piazza outside that provides architectural unity in a late Baroque/Rococo style. It is designed to look like a stage, in the idea of teatro mundi—life as a stage, and we are the players. The facade of the church was completed in 1626, and it's a church connected to the Jesuit seminary. The frescos inside show the apotheosis ...