Ballinvounig House

Address: Dingle, Dingle, Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry, Ireland | Hotel
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This hotel, located on Dingle, Dingle, is near Dingle Oceanworld, An Droichead Beag, Brian de Staic Jewellery Workshop, and Archeological Tours.
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    TripAdvisor Reviews Ballinvounig House Dingle

    5.00 of 5 stars Outstanding

    Travel Blogs from Dingle

    Clouds, clouds and more clouds

    A travel blog entry by chintz on Jun 16, 2015

    5 photos

    ... correspondence received from the Government, is bilingual. Ireland became a member of the European Economic Union in 1973.

    Slea Head on the Wild Atlantic Way, is the most western tip of Ireland. It's rugged coastline on a day like today, does make it look treacherous.

    The Dingle Peninsula is so pretty to travel along. The roads with their hedges growing along the sides, are very narrow and challenging, but due to the great skill of ...

    Dolphin Chasing, Shopping, and Beautiful Vistas

    A travel blog entry by psubrat93 on Sep 02, 2014

    40 photos

    ... but I finally find a sweater for my mom. Just what I was looking for! I just wish they would have had it in my size as well.

    On the way back to the car I notice the road sign for the Conor Pass. I have read about this and decide to discuss it with Jen. Our initial plan for the day was to drive around the Peninsula but it is later than we had planned plus it seems you need to double the estimated driving time. I ask her if she is ok with ...

    Great music, gorgeous scenery, friendly people

    A travel blog entry by jklezok on Jul 24, 2014

    19 photos

    ... We can't actually walk the fort until it is shored up.

    After this we check out the Famine houses. They have a unintentional petting zoo on the way up to the buildings. So we stop to pet the donkeys, horses, goats and dogs. Once you get to the top you can see the houses. They have an excellent exhibit of what happened during the potato famine in the 1844 -1849. The potatoes, which was the crop of the poor folks, had a blight and they rotted in ...

    Tá áthas orm - There is happiness upon m

    A travel blog entry by mystic1 on Jul 15, 2014

    7 photos

    ... where the book said, and easily recognizable from the drawing. I was really happy to find it and grabbed some happy pictures. I also spent a moment looking around the site. While the purpose of the Ogham stones is up for debate, and some may be only boundary markers or grave markers, some seem to be placed on pre-existing sacred sites, so it's worth a look around. The valley that this was in is lovely and from where I stood I had a ...

    Famine Scars

    A travel blog entry by efrohoff on Jul 10, 2014

    2 comments, 13 photos

    ... only rotten potatoes. The weather feels appropriate for such a bleak landscape. It's dreary and overcast. The sun rests above the grey clouds that refuse to part for the rays.

    A stark reminder of the famine are the Famine Cottages we stop at. They remain from the 1840's and are furnished in the period. Dirt packed floors, sparse pieces of furniture and a straw bed fill the space. A thatch roof keeps out most of the weather. The homes are a ...