Titanic Apartments

66 Lisburn Rd, Belfast, Northern Ireland, BT1, United Kingdom | 4 star hostel
Searching for availability...
*Prices above are provided by partners for one room, double occupancy and do not include all taxes and fees. Please see our partners for full details.
 

How has this hostel rated in the past?

  What's this?
Discover trends in hotel experiences based on real traveler reviews and ratings. Mouse over circles to see what some travelers had to say.

Location

This 4 star hostel, located in the Malone area of Belfast, is near Royal Belfast Academical Institution, Clarke & Dawe, Roast Coffee Club & Mezzanine Gallery, and Emer Gallery.
Map this hostel
       

    TripAdvisor Reviews Titanic Apartments Belfast

    3.50 of 5 stars Very Good
     

    Travel Blogs from Belfast

    Belfast

    A travel blog entry by joeandsally on Aug 13, 2014

    3 comments, 8 photos

    ... Amazing tour around Belfast learning of all the bombings and even saw the 40 foot wall and gates that get opened and closed daily still between the catholics and the prodostants! Had a very interesting tour of the Crumlin Road Jail. Even into the hanging chamber where a guy on our tour group fainted!! Put us all on edge for a few minutes as we were looking down through the hanging doors. Even went through ...

    History of the troubles

    A travel blog entry by julieandnick on Jun 23, 2014

    2 comments, 15 photos

    When I suggested we go to Belfast, Julie was concerned because of the conflict between the IRA and the Protestants. All over I said, it's all in the past now, don't be worried.
    To get a history lesson we went for a Black Cab ride with the first cab driver we found that conducted the tour. As luck would have it, it was in a red cab driven by a catholic Irishman who implied he was a former member of the ...

    Giant's Causeway, Donegal and Derry

    A travel blog entry by caroline_cook27 on May 23, 2014

    4 photos

    ... whiskey!

    We then went on to the Giant's Causeway where we walked down to the hexagonal shaped stone columns. They were like stepping stones and we were able to climb over them and look out across the sea. We walked up the hillside as far as the path went and then headed back to a small pub for a pint before getting the bus back in to Belfast.

    Once back in Belfast we went to a nearby restaurant for dinner. It wasn't the best steak I've ever eaten ...

    Ireland, day four

    A travel blog entry by golfchick0112 on Apr 23, 2014

    4 photos

    ... and the Protestant side of town (Shankhill Road and northeast), they had to erect a wall called the Peace Wall to keep the citizens on both sides safe. Of course it didn't prevent much. Bombs were still thrown over the wall and it had to be built taller on two different occasions. There are also other, shorter walls around Belfast too. Lots and lots and lots of violence and battles and fires and bombs and killings and attacks on IRA/UVF members as well as innocent people. ...

    Old Wounds, New Walls

    A travel blog entry by karatedude99999 on Mar 29, 2014

    9 photos

    ... gates onto the Catholic side of the wall, called the Falls Road neighbourhood. Like Shankill it remains a largely working class neighbourhood, and with a large proportion of people living in state subsidized housing (a key pillar of the Good Friday Agreement). The neighbourhoods definitely had a rough feel, yet even here, like much of Belfast crime rates are quite low.

    Murals on this side of the wall had a Catholic leaning slant, but also ...