Lhasa River Guest House

Address: House No 22/ Third Pass/ Compound No 2, Xian Zu Dao Ecologicalpark, Lhasa, Tibet, 850000, China | Hotel
 
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Location

This hotel, located on House No 22/ Third Pass/ Compound No 2, Xian Zu Dao Ecologicalpark, Lhasa, is near Potala Palace, Sera Monastery, Barkhor Street, and Drepung Monastery (Zhebang Si).
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    TripAdvisor Reviews Lhasa River Guest House

    2.50 of 5 stars Fair
     

    Travel Blogs from Lhasa

    Roof of the World

    A travel blog entry by kvolsky on Oct 21, 2014

    30 photos

    ... here is covered in gold and the donation boxes are overflowing. You can barely see the statues behind the glass as so many bills have been shoved in. I think there are more than just the Chinese using this temple wishing for wealth.


    Since I didn't have time to see the whole complex the first time around I returned to the Johkang temple in the morning to check out the upper floors and wound up having a lot of the area to myself. My guide ...

    Shigatse to Lhasa, Tibet

    A travel blog entry by wanderingsteph on Oct 14, 2014

    6 photos

    ... today was nothing short of spectacular. We again made high passes at Kora la and Kambala. We saw Yamdrok Lake and it was so beautiful to have some water backdropped by snow capped mountains. We drove the craziest road either of us had ever been on into the yellow valley. It was pretty much kilometre after kilometre of hairpin bends down the mountain. The view was spectacular. I have to note the red and white bollards protected cars from plunging off the road ...

    Day 26 Exploring Lhasa: Potala Palace & Jokhang

    A travel blog entry by yanniabelle on Oct 12, 2014

    46 photos

    ... rooms. There are 1,000 rooms in the palace but only 22 of them are open to the public. The Dalai Lama use to reside in the palace before 1959 when China took over Tibet. The red part of the palace was the spiritual part where many monks lingered and there were big tubs of burning butter. I've never seen this before in any temples but here in Tibet, Buddhist bring butter to the temples as an offering and put it in these huge bowls where ...

    Do you know what a monk life looks like?

    A travel blog entry by anaketa on May 03, 2014

    15 photos

    ... us to put it in a plastic bag (!!) but sawing our faces she tried to find another solution. At the end he decided for a bottle. But when he came out from the kitchen, he hold the soup inside a kind of marmalade recipient. We went all the way back to the hotel with this glass recipient with the orange liquid inside and, once in the hotel, we had to literally drink the soup. What we learnt: - Never, and I say never, throw the papier in the chinese ...

    Our time in Tibet

    A travel blog entry by christine_n_den on Nov 19, 2013

    1 comment, 104 photos

    ... strikes in Nepal (due to an election). We then had to go through a preliminary x-ray scanner and then a health stop where they used a fancy gun to take our temperature. "B", a young man from the Netherlands was singled out due to a high reading, fortunately it was due to his hat, rather than a fever. Next they went through our bags, removing any book that referenced the Dalai Lama - a British couple even lost their India Lonely Planet! Next we had to show ...