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starlagurl
This kind of goes with that notorious post on boycotting countries....

Overseas arrivals in the U.S. have declined 11 per cent this decade, from 26 million in 2000 to 23 million in 2007. That's all happening while the travel industry as a whole grows 6 per cent per year!

From declining travel visas, to only-English signs in abundance, it seems that visiting the states is getting more and more difficult. Especially for people who are not from the list of 29 countries whose residents can visit the US without a visa. For some perspective, Canada's list is 50 countries long. In theory, it's easier for a Mexican resident to visit Europe, than it is for him/her to visit the US. It's completely astounding!

The declining dollar is supposed to bring more tourism, and I wonder if it really will. Especially with an attitude like this.

What do you think? Are Americans too mean for international tourism? Even though it's a beautiful country, is the red tape and crass attitude getting in the way?

When you hear all that bad news about the American economy, it seems that tourism should be something they should be embracing. I think it's time to change some tourism policies, no?


Link to the World Hum article that inspired me.
mmbcross
The United States is one of the few countries in the world that doesn't have a national tourism office. Most tour promotions are left to the individual states and to private companies.

The Bahamas alone outspends all the U.S. States' budgets for tourism. I guess the U.S. feels it gets enough world coverage without having to spend money on tourism ads!
starlagurl
Interesting thing about the Bahamas, have you noticed that the Atlantis hotel on Paradise Island always just seems to "pop up" in big budget movies like Casino Royale and After the Sunset??? Who paid for those product placements, huh? Hmmm... offtopic.gif
rbisset
I'm not going to USA again, unless necessary, until there is a change in the current administration. Being treated like a criminal and interrogated for 45 minutes for doing the heinous crime of flying into one of their airports is a disgrace! USA really needs to sort out it's customs officials who have a seriously inflated opinion of self-worth!
starlagurl
Yeah, the border guards, even at the land crossings are usually so yucky and unfriendly...ugh...
mmbcross
Goodness! I'm glad I am already here, though once upon a time, before I got my residency, I had to go through all that crap too. If it weren't for the weather, I'd prefer to live in Canada. Perhaps with global warming, Canada will soon be in the tropics.
starlagurl
Uh oh, looks like there might be a French backlash of some sort? According to LostWeekend.tv, which I don't think is a reputable source, really, they say that France will be limiting the number of American travelers to France. If anybody sees this on a bigger website/news source let me know, because it's really serious!

Link to the article

Never ones to spare other countries sensibilities, Paris has announced that they will place limits on the number of US tourists they'll admit into France from the 1st of January next year.

Mirroring similar quotas the country already has in place for visitors from various other non-European countries, including Russia and China, the French foreign minister cited economic concerns and the "popularity of France" as the reasoning behind the limitation.
rbisset
Umm posted on April 1st.....
starlagurl
Hahaha, what really? You think it's a joke? But...there's a video!
starlagurl
Oh, oops I'm confused...yeah it's probably a joke...
introducinlyric
QUOTE(rbisset @ Apr 9 2008, 06:07 AM) *

I'm not going to USA again, unless necessary, until there is a change in the current administration. Being treated like a criminal and interrogated for 45 minutes for doing the heinous crime of flying into one of their airports is a disgrace! USA really needs to sort out it's customs officials who have a seriously inflated opinion of self-worth!



i agree but this is a shame as i do wana go back to the united states as it is my birth place and their are places i wana visit there but the whole customs thing is off putting no surprise theres a drop in tourism. the fact you get photographed and finger printed is absurd!! your not a crim for flying into and visitng a country
mmbcross
Look at it from the U.S. point of view. How do they know that you are not going to blow up the White House, president and all, with a bottle of deadly Coke? If you do, at least they will have a photo of you and will be able to publish it on the front page of the New York Times.
starlagurl
Ohhhhhhhhhhhh, methinks those is fighting words...
laorfamily
As in any country, one must separate the government policies from the people.

mmbcross - I know you posted your reply in an ironic tone, but it's probably very true.

That being said, the US has the most horrific, inefficient, idiotic and rude airport security system. The whole “airport security” issue has to do with only one thing – keeping the masses scared.
There, I said it!!!

They took a bunch of people who couldn’t get a job flipping burgers and gave them federal authority to harass others. I’m actually surprised tourism fell by only 11%, I would have thought it would be much higher.

People here (the US) are actually starting to see through the Bush administration shenanigans and are starting to demand meaningful change.
starlagurl
Haaaaaaaahahahaha that is a wonderful hilarious analogy about the airport security people! I believe it is like this in Canada too.
starlagurl
Do you really?
mmbcross
Hey chaps. We are coming back to the earlier blog on Travelpod about the Canadian flag being used by US travellers scared of not being welcomed with open arms. I guess everyone loves a Canadian!
netravel
I was not going to respond until I got to that quote about Americans being mean.

While you brought out good points, I think it is highly unfair to classify Americans as Unfriendly. Perhaps They are in the common Tourist Areas, such as the East and West Coasts...but here in the Midwest, where we host the College World Series, we love our tourists! You have to remember that people in the "Big" tourist areas have had their fill of rude tourists as well. In Nebraksa, we value the tourist dollar and realize that it helps not only economically, but also to bring awareness that there IS more to the US than California and New York.
Just my 2 cents worth...

Veronica

QUOTE(starlagurl @ Apr 8 2008, 09:58 AM) *

This kind of goes with that notorious post on boycotting countries....

Overseas arrivals in the U.S. have declined 11 per cent this decade, from 26 million in 2000 to 23 million in 2007. That's all happening while the travel industry as a whole grows 6 per cent per year!

From declining travel visas, to only-English signs in abundance, it seems that visiting the states is getting more and more difficult. Especially for people who are not from the list of 29 countries whose residents can visit the US without a visa. For some perspective, Canada's list is 50 countries long. In theory, it's easier for a Mexican resident to visit Europe, than it is for him/her to visit the US. It's completely astounding!

The declining dollar is supposed to bring more tourism, and I wonder if it really will. Especially with an attitude like this.

What do you think? Are Americans too mean for international tourism? Even though it's a beautiful country, is the red tape and crass attitude getting in the way?

When you hear all that bad news about the American economy, it seems that tourism should be something they should be embracing. I think it's time to change some tourism policies, no?


Link to the World Hum article that inspired me.

Paul
For me there are a number of reasons.

First I will start by saying that I disagree with the policies of the USA government and many of it's big businesses - but I also disagree with the policies of Myanmar, some of Thailand's, Australia's, ... Actually, just about everywhere. So that isn't stopping me going anywhere.

Second, I have no doubt that many USA people are friendly (probably very friendly) and some of their environment (which is extremely under promoted) would be great to see. I have nothing against the average USA person as a person.

But, I am not going to USA. Why?

1. I simply can't afford it. The flights, the food, the extra taxes/tips, the accommodation,... I could never afford to travel in the USA.

2. To quote an earlier post :"I'm not going to USA again, unless necessary, until there is a change in the current administration. Being treated like a criminal and interrogated for 45 minutes for doing the heinous crime of flying into one of their airports is a disgrace! USA really needs to sort out it's customs officials who have a seriously inflated opinion of self-worth!"

I totally agree. I don't intend to be treated in that manner or have my family treated in that way. So that also puts me off. Just out of interest, this is also a reason why I don't visit my country of origin, Australia, very often, as at times the customs officials there also treat me as a criminal. Slightly annoying as I served in their Army for 9 years as an officer and so I wonder who these high school drop outs think they are treating me that way. Any, moving on.

3. I have no desire to visit and see Western culture. More than anything, when I travel I want to try to escape from Western culture, and this is getting harder and harder as it floods the world. So travelling into the heart of it - no thanks.

That's it. See ya.

mmbcross
I'm amazed that you get hassles going back to your own country. Even though tourists and visitors to the USA are viewed as potential terrorists until they can prove without a shadow of a doubt that that are just coming to see Mickey Mouse, US citizens and residents don't go through that same crap coming back through immigration...unless of course, your name is Mohamed. I bet even Barak Obama would have a problem getting in if he mislaid his passport, especially as his middle name is Hussein.

Although the US seems to produce exceptionally courageous military, the general populace is scared S*$#less of everything and everyone who is not exactly like them, which is crazy, as more deaths in the USA are caused by people just like them with legally purchased AK 47s and a chip on their shoulder.
starlagurl
*sigh* Yeah it's really depressing...are there any answers? What can you do in your day to day life to try and help the situation?
mmbcross
I refuse to have any friends that possess guns. To my mind only cowards own guns.
starlagurl
Even hunters?
netravel
QUOTE(mmbcross @ Jun 9 2008, 02:43 PM) *

I refuse to have any friends that possess guns. To my mind only cowards own guns.


Hmmm, well, I have alll sorts of friends. I do NOT allow guns in my home, nor in the homes of places my children used to visit (they are older now.) I would discourage friends from having guns, but as Louise pointed out...there are Hunters, and in the Midwest US They are quiet common.

I recently read there is more gun related crime in South Africa than America. Trying to find that article again, but also read one that crime itself per 1,000 population is Higher in England.

Not to defend the US. There is a lot of killing, too much. I say in every day life we can become more educated about guns and crime, and EDUCATE [i] our children.

Again, just my 2 cents worth

Veronica
starlagurl
Yeah, it's a tough call... it calls for some balance... and it's balanced people like you who help improve the image of the U.S.
mmbcross
Sorry about that, but to my mind guns are made to kill, be it humans or animals. I cannot see any amusement in shooting animals. I sincerely doubt if gun deaths are higher in South Africa than in the US, of that there is more crime in the UK. I may be wrong, so I would be interested to read the article. Here is an interesting, albeit somewhat outdated discussion.
http://time-blog.com/swampland/2007/04/gun...not_likely.html
starlagurl
Yeah, I don't see how people get enjoyment out of it. But there is a fringe minority (e.g. natives) who live and die by their rifle.
laorfamily
From Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_politics#Statistics


The National Center for Policy Analysis, a conservative think tank, reported the following statistics:[98]

New Jersey adopted what sponsors described as "the most stringent gun law" in the nation in 1966; two years later, the murder rate was up 46% and the reported robbery rate had nearly doubled.
In 1968, Hawaii imposed a series of increasingly harsh measures, and its murder rate tripled from a low of 2.4 per 100,000 in 1968 to 7.2 by 1977.
In 1976, Washington, D.C., enacted one of the most restrictive gun control laws in the nation. Since then, the city's murder rate has risen 134% while the national murder rate has dropped 2%.
In addition:

Over 50% of American households own guns, despite government statistics showing the number is approximately 35%, because guns not listed on any government roll were not counted during the gathering of data.[99]
Evanston, Illinois, a Chicago suburb of 75,000 residents, became the largest town to ban handgun ownership in September 1982 but experienced no decline in violent crime.
Among the 15 states with the highest homicide rates, 10 have restrictive or very restrictive gun laws.[100]
Twenty percent of U.S. homicides occur in four cities with just 6% of the population—New York, Chicago, Detroit and Washington, D.C.—and each has (or, in the case of Detroit, had until 2001) a virtual prohibition on private handguns.
UK banned private ownership of most handguns in 1997, previously held by an estimated 57,000 people—0.1% of the population.[101] Since 1998, the number of people injured by firearms in England and Wales has more than doubled.[102] In 2005-06, of 5,001 such injuries, 3,474 (69%) were defined as "slight," and a further 965 (19%) involved the "firearm" being used as a blunt instrument. Twenty-four percent of injuries were caused with air weapons, and 32% with "imitation firearms" (including BB guns and soft air weapons).[103] Since 1998, the number of fatal shootings has varied between 49 and 97, and was 50 in 2005.
Australia forced the surrender of nearly 650,000 personal firearms in 1997. A study published in 2001[104] shows a 47% decrease of firearms related deaths, but also reveals an overall rise in non-firearm related violent crime[not in citation given].
Violent crime accelerated in Jamaica after handguns were banned.[105]
The FBI's annual Uniform Crime Report ranking of cities over 40,000 in population by violent crime rates (per 100,000 population) finds that the ten cities with the highest violent crime rates for 2003 include three cities in the very strict state of New Jersey, one in the fairly restrictive state of Massachusetts, whereas the rest have recently adopted laws that allow for the carrying of a handgun with a permit
laorfamily
"gun laws have played an important role in reducing crime rates in the US.
Since 1986, more than 25 states have passed new laws encouraging responsible citizens to carry concealed handguns. As a result, the numbers of armed Americans in malls and in their cars has grown to almost 3 million men and women.
As surprising as it is to the media, these new laws have caused violent crime rates to drop, including homicide rates. In his scholarly book, More Guns, Less Crime, Professor John Lott shows how violent crime has fallen faster in those states that have introduced concealed carry laws than in the rest of the US (Lott 2000). His study is the most comprehensive analysis of American crime data ever completed. He shows that criminals are rational enough to fear being shot by armed civilians. "

One thing we, as travelers and me as head of house hold, have to admit - there are very bad people out there.
Those people aren't afraid of going to jail, aren't afraid of the police, and are not afraid of getting beaten up.
Do you know what they are afraid of?
Walking into a house and finding a 50 year old housewife pointing a gun to their head.

As this post noted, gun control does nothing but takes the legal guns out of responsible people's hands.
I am, however, in favor of much more stringent criteria of recieving a gun. A serious back ground check, a mandatory safety class, and being able to pass a shooting range test yearly.
lraleigh
BUT:

"The level of Canadian travel to the United States observed in the past six months has been the highest since 1998," Statistics Canada reported. frantics.gif hug.gif

IT isn't crime, as crime is falling fast in the US. Aside from gun related crimes (down 50%), crime in the US is similar to other developed countries. I know America can be violent as I've worked in one of the most violent of them all, where the neighbor of our community garden was shot.

Read Bomb the Suburbs by Upski for an interesting take on all this "US dangerous place stuff" (Upski crashed on my couch as he was walking in all the most "dangerous" places in America at night, to prove they weren't that dangerous). I've shed my blood as well because of a racial hate crime, but have forgiven.

Could be the border control folks, but...

Things go up. Things go down. And the US travel industry is large both with both foreign and domestic travelers. Most of the growth will be in the newbees, not in the US or Canada or France. I'd guess Eastern Europe tourism is really growing, by contrast.

Blame the media. devil.png

Looking at Travelpods, most travelers go from city to city, thinking they can see the US this way...Of course, you can know what the cities are like from this, but some of the best of America is outside the cities in the countryside.

And there are plenty of people from all countries of the world. Met an American in Egypt who was Palestinian for example. Over 10% of the country are foreign-born.

Somehow, I detect an anti-American bias in how this thread was presented, hmmmmmm. That's ok, I can understand that.

BUT I could easily ask: Why people stay away from Canada? Are they jerks? Why are Germans scared to travel to Canada? Do they have crass attitudes? Do they molest sheep? crying_anim02.gif sick.png

http://www.cbc.ca/money/story/2008/05/20/travel.html

I won't ask that question, however, because its not a fair question if you're a Canadian. All countries have their trouble-makers and their gurus and their gems and their animal buggerers and those people who will become your friends.

That said, boundaries are pointless in so many ways and talk like this is really counter-productive to travel and understanding (as are some difficult border guards). America definitely needs some help in the karma department for sure, but let's not hide behind easily-manipulated statistics...

Ok...all that over with, whenever I'm settled, ya'll can crash on my couch. (I don't own a gun)

peace. hug.gif
laorfamily
lraleigh - on the nose.

Also, people forget that the "United States" is actually 50 countries with common currency and lax trade agreements.

So now if we take said article and group all the Englis, Irish, Scottish, German, Italian, Spanish and French into one group we'll get a much different picture.
mmbcross
Regrettably statistics prove that a 50 year old housewife pointing a gun to their head is much more likely to shoot herself or a family member over the course of her lifetime than any armed or unarmed intruder.

I know, you can use statistics to prove anything, but I feel much safer in a McDonalds in London than in Los Angeles.
laorfamily
QUOTE(mmbcross @ Jun 10 2008, 04:22 PM) *

Regrettably statistics prove that a 50 year old housewife pointing a gun to their head is much more likely to shoot herself or a family member over the course of her lifetime than any armed or unarmed intruder.



Right, I agree.
Which brings me back to my point about taking mandatory yearly classes.
mmbcross
I agree. If all gun owners had to take a test just like car drivers do, I would feel much safer. Yearly refresher courses would be even better, but a hard sell I'm afraid.
netravel
Here is one of the articles I read. Statistics were in the BBC.

"According to the BBC News, handgun crime in the United Kingdom rose by 40% in the two years after it passed its draconian gun ban in 1997.18 And according to a United Nations study, British citizens are more likely to become a victim of crime than are people in the United States. The 2000 report shows that the crime rate in England is higher than the crime rates of 16 other industrialized nations, including the United States."

Another great site with chart is Gun statistics Note the County Population along with the gun related death rate.

I will look up some other sites for another post. One interesting thing is though, the VAST majority of US Gun related crime is by and on African American People. I do not recall any time in recent history where and international traveller was killed by an American.

All I am saying is look at the facts...ALL of the facts. It is easy to bend statistics to any stance one wants to take.
mmbcross
I have to admit that I am surprised and saddened by this report. When I lived in Britain, use of guns was almost unheard of, even by the police.

Although I am vehemently against easy access to guns, I do not feel threatened in the US, nor should any tourist be put off by this aspect. I don't go to McDonalds for reasons other than safety. Nevertheless, the more guns that are available to the populace means that there is a much higher chance of being involved in a random shooting, which are quite commonplace here.
Here's what I mean:
The United States is a large modern country with devolving inner cities. There are more than 200 million guns in the possession of Americans. Most violent acts in the States are the result of robberies, domestic disputes and drug-related violence. Terrorist acts, ranging from the killing of abortionist doctors to the bombing of the World Trade Center, are highly publicized but not considered a real threat to travelers. The threat of robbery or violent crime in inner cities and some tourist areas is real and should be taken seriously. Travel in America is considered safe, and danger is confined to random violence and inner cities. Those seeking adventure can find it in a New Orleans bar at five in the morning or strolling through South Central L.A. after midnight.

Here is a dated but pretty grim report on violent America:
http://www.comebackalive.com/df/dplaces/unitedst/index.htm
As you say, statistics can prove anything, and we can go on ad infinitum in his respect.
starlagurl
200 million guns...how many people live there??? 300 million?
mmbcross
Yes, that does seem a bit far fetched. The US population is 304,311,342
laorfamily
QUOTE(mmbcross @ Jun 11 2008, 07:25 AM) *

Nevertheless, the more guns that are available to the populace means that there is a much higher chance of being involved in a random shooting, which are quite commonplace here.


I don't know about that, in Israel almost every person has a gun in their home and many have handguns, yet random shootings are almost unheard of.

In Kennesaw, Georgia, by law, every head of house hold must have a gun (which cannot be used or brought off the property), break ins, theaft, robberies etc. in that town are almost zero.

"In fact, more than 25 years after the ban, not a single resident of Kennesaw has been involved in a fatal shooting - as a victim, attacker or defender. There has been one firearm related murder but not from a resident of Kennesaw. Since the ordinance, no child has ever been injured with a firearm in Kennesaw. Crime dropped after the ordinance and the city has maintained an exceptionally low crime rate ever since, even with the population swelling from 5,000 in 1982 to approximately 30,000 today. The truth is crime has plummeted and population has soared."

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/7...for.html?cat=17
mmbcross
I am a home owner. Does that mean I would be obliged to have a gun in Kenneshaw, in spite of my opinion? This surely must go against the constitution. No seems to be able to ban guns, but we can force people to posses them, whether they like it or not. It looks like the NRA runs the city of Kenneshaw.

I live in Miami Springs, population 13,422, median income $50,000. I can only find this record for 2003 The number of violent crimes recorded by the FBI in 2003 was 80. The number of murders and homicides was 0. The violent crime rate was 5.7 per 1,000 people.. No one is forced to tote a gun in Miami Springs, and there were no homicides. To be honest, I've lived here for 20 years and I cannot recall a homicide. We are located on the north perimeter of Miami International Airport, so we are not nearly as insulated as Kennesaw. Virtually all of the crime in Miami Springs is along 36th. Street, bordering the airport.

I also found this astounding fact online Guns are used 2.5 million times a year in self-defense. Law-abiding citizens use guns to defend themselves against criminals as many as 2.5 million times every year—or about 6,850 times a day. Unless we are still living in Dodge City, I find this statistic extremely had to swallow.

By the way, you can't compare the circumstances of Israel to the USA.


starlagurl
That surprises me, that random shootings are unheard of in Israel? Wha?
laorfamily
QUOTE(starlagurl @ Jun 11 2008, 01:26 PM) *

That surprises me, that random shootings are unheard of in Israel? Wha?


I don't know.

Mind you, I'm not arguing about ethics or morals, I'm just following the facts with an unbiased mind - I'd like to see a gun-free world as well (I'm much better with a sword).

I find this example from the book "Freakonomics" amazing:

"In a given year, there is one drowning of a child for every 11,000 residential pools in the United States. In a country with 6 million pools, this means that roughly 550 children under the age of ten drown each year. Meanwhile, there is 1 child killed by a gun for every 1 million-plus guns. In a country with an estimated 200 million guns, this means that roughly 175 children under ten die each year from guns. The likelihood of death by pool (1 in 11,000) versus death by gun (1 in a million plus) isn't even close: Molly is roughly 100 times more likely to die in a swimming pool accident at Suzy's house than in gunplay at Rick's."
mmbcross
I believe that, but the 175 children under ten that die each year from guns is unacceptable. The roughly 550 children under the age of ten that drown each year in swimming pools is also unacceptable. In both cases it shows a parent's total irresponsibility. In both cases the parents should not have the gun or the pool if they cannot protect their children and should be tried for negligent homicide (gross negligence manslaughter in the UK). This occurs where there is no intention to kill or cause serious injury but death is due to recklessness or criminal negligence.
starlagurl
Kids usually drown because they are not educated... they don't know how to swim...

Kids usually die by gun because they are innocent bystanders, or someone else made a stupid mistake... also lack of education...
darrenstravels
I've been to the states quite a few times now, to numerous places each time. Even had the fortune to study there for a couple of semesters a few years ago.

Can understand why some are very negative about the place, whether it be the horrible immigration system or its politics....however I don't agree with the politics of many countries I've been too, but I don't let it affect my decision to go someplace. If it looks like an interesting place, and it's within my budget, I'll go. The thought of crime, education, or what it's politicians are like play no part in my decision really.

My sole reason for not going to the USA again anytime soon is simply that I've more of the world to see first. Thats it. I've had a great time there each trip, the majority of the people were really good to me and there is so, so many places to see it's somewhere I'm drawn to time and time again.
starlagurl
Yeah, I agree with you darren. My reason for traveling to the states a lot in the next few years is because I want to see the states. That's it!
Paul
This is in the Australian news today and perhaps is another good example of why people stay away from USA:

"An Australian woman has told how her trip to the United States became holiday hell when a visa mix-up landed her in a detention camp.

Laura McKenzie spent weeks in legal limbo before being freed, and can't come home until she's faced an American court.

She started in the Canadian snowfields before crossing the border for what was meant to be a six week tour of the United States.

But her holiday ended on a bus trip in Texas when she was arrested by an immigration officer for overstaying her tourist visa.

She spent three weeks in custody, was moved from one cell to another, without being allowed to call home, before ending up in a detention centre on the US-Mexico border.

Laura's mistake was a technical one. Her six-month US visa officially started when she touched down in Hawaii on her way to Canada, and unknown to her, by the time she returned to America, her visa was just days away from expiring. But immigration still let her in.

Laura's mother Anne flew to America to fight to free her daughter. So far, it has cost the family $15,000.

Laura is now out on bail, accused of being in America illegally.

She is not allowed to leave until a court hearing in a month."


Who has heard of the term "Zenophobia"?
laorfamily
This is what happened when you take people who royally screw up, give them a raise and federal authority (talking about the people working at the airports).

SNL had a great skit on it.
starlagurl
Wow...that really really sucks...I guess she had some sort of layover in Hawaii? Total jerks...

and yeah, I saw that skit: "What about a roast beef sandwich with gravy? Is that a liquid?"
zijuzijazijana
QUOTE(starlagurl @ Apr 8 2008, 09:58 AM) *

This kind of goes with that notorious post on boycotting countries....

Overseas arrivals in the U.S. have declined 11 per cent this decade, from 26 million in 2000 to 23 million in 2007. That's all happening while the travel industry as a whole grows 6 per cent per year!

From declining travel visas, to only-English signs in abundance, it seems that visiting the states is getting more and more difficult. Especially for people who are not from the list of 29 countries whose residents can visit the US without a visa. For some perspective, Canada's list is 50 countries long. In theory, it's easier for a Mexican resident to visit Europe, than it is for him/her to visit the US. It's completely astounding!

The declining dollar is supposed to bring more tourism, and I wonder if it really will. Especially with an attitude like this.

What do you think? Are Americans too mean for international tourism? Even though it's a beautiful country, is the red tape and crass attitude getting in the way?

When you hear all that bad news about the American economy, it seems that tourism should be something they should be embracing. I think it's time to change some tourism policies, no?


Link to the World Hum article that inspired me.


Hi,
There is a lot of reasons for American Tourism to decline.It's very easy to come up with a few of them just reading blogs of people who are travelers.Generally speaking America became less save for the money .There is a lot of advertising about cheap prices but they are only cheap to Americans.I myself don't like to pick cheap deals cause they are not worth it,if I don't have enough money to go to the place I want to go and have fun there I simply don't go.I travel cheap only in emergency cases.

The American attitude is another thing but it all depends where and what the situation is all about.Don't talk about American attitude to me cause I have lived through hell and I didn't harm no one yet.I'm an American citizen who lives in Poland now and every idiot here wants to make me humble for no appearent reason.Who gives them permission and why to assault Americans?As I have mentioned in my other comment I almost lost my life just extending my passport.Anyone who is from USA and travels outside the country needs to realize that he or she is in danger,just owning American Passport is dangerous.Why to go then?Unless someone needs to have a trill and wants danger in life.There is a lot of travel agencies at fault,they will not tell the truth and that's how it starts.
Money as always is the subject.America is not cheap,so why to make it a cheap deal for someone who will come over and will have to go right back and will cause a lot of trouble?
Than there is this denial some people live in,they don't want to faze the fact that they can't afford American trip,they need to be informed about all the costs and if it's necessary someone needs to stop them from going.There is so many cheap places to go in the world and they could be beautiful but question is who wants to go there?Americans are being hated across the world for the way they are.I certainly will not change my attitute for no one,I'm free,I'm American.You don't like it take a hike.
Aha, about the tourism in America it's not as bad as you thing but for the rest of the world it is.
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