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Jessica_CDN
Click to view attachmentWhat is the most interesting city in the US? I've been to a few, and Washington D.C. gets my vote.

It's got politics, beautiful buildings, the Smithsonian Museums, good shows and great shopping.
wakingdream
I'd say San Fran for me, but I haven't been to loads of different cities in the U.S.

I found San Fran to be really cool b/c it has something for everyone. Museums, galleries, great restos, awesome music & film scene, really good nightlife, lovely architecture, tons of different culture, very interesting people, wicked bookstores, the ocean, close to so many other great places such as National Parks, trails galore & great drives. Oh, and Haight/Ashbury!

I don't know if it's the most interesting city in the U.S., but it is by far the most interesting that I've visited.
aopaq
I also haven't been to many US cities and the time I spent in any of them was not enough to provide a critical comparison. However I did enjoy my short stay in NYC probably mostly because it was the Big Apple.

In reality, I am not a fan of any city seeing as I have been living in hamlets of less than 2500 people for over 10 years.
Jessica_CDN
Do you find cities overwhelming when you're travelling?

I quite like a city - but it has to be pretty well-designed with a good transit system for me to stick around! Otherwise I give up. Metros are best.
His Royal Monkeyness
I've been to most the major cities in the USA. I think I'd have to go with NYC as the most interesting. It's got a little bit of everything and can entertain and surprise you on each visit.

I liked Boston a lot too. It has some of the oldest buildings in the U.S. and a lot of history (as far as American cities go). Neat little ethnic areas as well.

D.C. is a cool place for a visit, though I definately wouldn't want to live there. You could probably spend a week just looking through the Smithsonian.

New Orleans is definately interesting. I haven't been post-hurricane. I hope it will get back to its former glory.

Las Vegas is interesting and certainly entertaining, but it also showcases the worst of America - greed, glutony... I'm always saddened to hear when I talk to travelers and they say on their visit to the USA they only saw LA and Vegas. It would be hard to pick two worse places for a real perspective of this country.

I'm not sure I could pick any of the west coast cities as "interesting". Seems most the highlights for us are the outdoor scenery on offer. The cities themselves aren't terribly exciting (though San Francisco would be my top pick for west coast cities). Portland used to have some interesting stuff - 24hr Church of Elvis, UFO Museum - but used to doesn't count for now.
battlemonkey
For me,t he appeal of New York is the ease of access to the stuff you want to do. In other cities, if I arrive unprepared, I can end up wandering around a deserted downtown district, wondering where the heck people go to eat and hang out. You have to know the neighborhoods, the small spots, and that's not easy info to pick up on the fly. New York, however, pretty much lays everything on the line for you. It's all easy, just about all of Manhattan is reasonably safe, the trains run all night, and you can always duck into a bookstore, grab a dining or nightlife guide, then be there shortly thereafter without any effort. I don't think I've found another city that offers obvious and easy access to things to do.

That said, I would still prefer London if only the weather was better. But then, that could just be because I live int he one but only visit the other, so the frustrations of calling a place home never manifest itself (and there are plenty of frustrations about calling New York home, at least for a country boy such as myself).

when traveling, though, I tend to enjoy smaller locations justa s much, if not more than the cities. I'd love to go back to Rome, for example, but I'd REALLY love to go back to Montepulciano.
whereshegoes
I would say "Carmel" because...well...obviously. But I am sure I am the only one who thinks this. Still, to each his own. I always thought it would be funny to have all the people who have names of places in the world to go have festivals there once a year. We can call it "Worldwide Egocentric Day" and it would have to be on a WEDnesday.
kitkatgo
I've been to quite a few cities here in the US, and, to me, New Orleans is the most interesting. It has so much history, and it is unlike any other city in the US or any where. The food is unbeatable, the flavor of the city is remarkable, and it's old, old, old (for a US city any way).
lznika
I live right by Chicago..and honestly..Chicago is a really cool place. Not gunna lie, it's better in the summer because it's warmer..but even in the winter it's beautiful. Especially when the snow covers everything. There are christmas lights everywhere and it's so fun to go ice skating.
But in the summer, there's so much to do. the Taste of Chicago is awesome. and it's nice because it's right by the lake and there are always nice boat rides to do. The museums are great, nightlife, everything. and Chicago is MUCH cleaner than New York. New York puts their garbage right on the streets because they don't have alleys but Chicago does so you don't have that mess everywhere. I reccommend Chicago.
Jessica_CDN
That's gross! NY has their garbage right on the street?? That's so unsanitary!

I've heard good things about Chicago...

Anyone like Philadelphia?
battlemonkey
QUOTE(Jessica_CDN @ Apr 11 2007, 05:13 PM) *

That's gross! NY has their garbage right on the street?? That's so unsanitary!

I've heard good things about Chicago...

Anyone like Philadelphia?


Unsanitary is an understatement. When you consider the sheer volume of garbage this city produces in a single day...

And not a week goes by that I don't see someone standing right next to a trash can, and they still toss their garbage on the street. Seriously, people, what the hell?

Chicago is definitely cleaner, but most cities are. I think even many municipal dumps are cleaner than New York. But New York is still, in my opinion, an easier town to find things in even if you don't know the neighborhoods. Before I had friend and local guides, I never knew where the heck to go in Chicago. But I do like that city a lot now that I have people to help me along.

I might also suggest my old home town of Louisville, Kentucky -- a nice mix of country and urban, with less traffic than Atlanta, some world-class restaurants, lots of bars and clubs, a vibrant local music scene that encompasses all genres, some decent museums, interesting history (including being a focal point for the civil rights movement), a nice riverfront, and great nature and hiking within easy day trip distance. You need to know where to go (as with many American downtowns that aren't Manhattan, it shuts down early and the action happens in the surrounding neighborhoods), but if you have that knowledge, it's a surprisingly interesting and energetic town. for whatever reason, it's missed out on being considered hip a la Austin and some other towns, but it has everything they have and then some (and, because it's not on the hipster map, it's a little more down to earth).

And hot browns -- toast piled with fresh turkey piled with bacon smothered in melted cheese. It'll kill you eventually, but the death will be worth it.
findingnine
QUOTE(whereshegoes @ Apr 10 2007, 06:10 PM) *

I would say "Carmel" because...well...obviously. But I am sure I am the only one who thinks this. Still, to each his own. I always thought it would be funny to have all the people who have names of places in the world to go have festivals there once a year. We can call it "Worldwide Egocentric Day" and it would have to be on a WEDnesday.


A fellow Keith at work drew my attention in the paper to the existence of Keithville Lousiana. I reckon I could make it down for a day.
wakingdream
QUOTE
Before I had friend and local guides, I never knew where the heck to go in Chicago. But I do like that city a lot now that I have people to help me along.


My husband lived in Chicago when he was younger for awhile. He loved it. I would love to check it out.

QUOTE
I might also suggest my old home town of Louisville, Kentucky -- a nice mix of country and urban, with less traffic than Atlanta, some world-class restaurants, lots of bars and clubs, a vibrant local music scene that encompasses all genres, some decent museums, interesting history (including being a focal point for the civil rights movement), a nice riverfront, and great nature and hiking within easy day trip distance. You need to know where to go (as with many American downtowns that aren't Manhattan, it shuts down early and the action happens in the surrounding neighborhoods), but if you have that knowledge, it's a surprisingly interesting and energetic town. for whatever reason, it's missed out on being considered hip a la Austin and some other towns, but it has everything they have and then some (and, because it's not on the hipster map, it's a little more down to earth).


I don't think I would have really ccondsidered going to Louisville before, but after reading this I feel odly compelled! Sounds pretty cool, with alot of great elements to the city.

QUOTE
Boston is a cool place.


Alright, turning out a great list here! Bob Dylan in Boston. It was great! Boston is very cool. yes.gif
wakingdream
QUOTE
Before I had friend and local guides, I never knew where the heck to go in Chicago. But I do like that city a lot now that I have people to help me along.


My husband lived in Chicago when he was younger for awhile. He loved it. I would love to check it out.

QUOTE
I might also suggest my old home town of Louisville, Kentucky -- a nice mix of country and urban, with less traffic than Atlanta, some world-class restaurants, lots of bars and clubs, a vibrant local music scene that encompasses all genres, some decent museums, interesting history (including being a focal point for the civil rights movement), a nice riverfront, and great nature and hiking within easy day trip distance. You need to know where to go (as with many American downtowns that aren't Manhattan, it shuts down early and the action happens in the surrounding neighborhoods), but if you have that knowledge, it's a surprisingly interesting and energetic town. for whatever reason, it's missed out on being considered hip a la Austin and some other towns, but it has everything they have and then some (and, because it's not on the hipster map, it's a little more down to earth).


I don't think I would have really ccondsidered going to Louisville before, but after reading this I feel odly compelled! Sounds pretty cool, with alot of great elements to the city.

QUOTE
Boston is a cool place.


Alright, turning out a great list here! Bob Dylan in Boston. It was great! Boston is very cool. yes.gif
Jessica_CDN
I've been to Boston before....but does it have a metro? I remember walking everywhere I went, so I never really found out. (I was only there for a weekend.)
His Royal Monkeyness
I think I need to go to Louisville to try some of those Hot Browns!

QUOTE(Jessica_CDN @ Apr 11 2007, 02:13 PM) *

Anyone like Philadelphia?

The historical area of Philadelphia is cool, but beyond that I didn't find much exciting. It has some very poor areas close in to the city center. On the one hand it would be nice if they fixed up the area, but then where are the low income families going to live.

QUOTE(Jessica_CDN @ Apr 13 2007, 08:03 AM) *

I've been to Boston before....but does it have a metro?

Yes, the T. I think I still have a subway token. I liked their 'Freedom Trail' - a red line you follow around town to the major historical landmarks. I thought that was pretty funny (got my picture with the red line).
Jessica_CDN
That's good enough - I just like trains 'cause they don't make me feel sick and generally run on time...better than buses anyway! And also, it's easy to figure out where they go 'cause they have to stay on the tracks. sick.png
findingnine
I had a pretty fun time on my one trip to New Orleans. That was a long time ago though, atleast a dozen years have past. It was still a bit of a culture shock, which I did not expect. Don't know what it's like these days, but I wouldn't turn down the chance to find out.
lznika
has anyone ever been to Hawaii?
bashleyf
This is a hard question to answer...I guess it depends on what you are looking for. Last year I went to Seattle and Chicago within two weeks, so it was easy to compare the two with them so fresh in my mind. Chicago is an amazing city...there is tons to do and the public transportation was good and easy to use. Definite big city feel. Seattle was also an amazing city, but it was much more laid back and calmer than Chicago...must be the west coast vibe. I loved both cities and would have a hard time choosing. I haven't been to the east coast yet, but I am finally making my way there in about a month. I have a feeling that Boston will be added to my list of favorite cities.
laorfamily
I donít think itís a fair question being that:
1) The US is a huge country
2) The nation is actually a union of 50 countries with their own unique style and culture all connected by a common bond of language, currency and trade agreements.

Itís almost like asking what is your favorite city in Europe, or S. America?

That being said I donít think one can answer that.
In NYC you can be in for two months and not be able to take advantage of all the city has to offer, you can spend a good two weeks in Washington DC just walking around the national mall and several days in Philadelphia before you start seeing the actual city. You can spend months in Las Vegas and not see anything, spend years in LA and not feel like you belong, or be in Dallas for three hours and call it home.

I guess thatís why people keep coming back.

Iíve actually had this conversation with a co-worker today, sheís from India and said something about ďAmericansĒ Ė I told her that you cannot make such a general statement because our area (NJ/NYC) is not ďAmericaĒ, but a small section of it and is not representative of the country in any way, shape or forum.
baphometdemon
Interesting is definitely a relative term, for me it would have to be San Francisco, with Seattle, Anchorage, Vegas and Washington DC all close behind. (And Portland, but that's a personal affinity).
travel4eternity
Of the (limited) US cities I've been to, I would say San Francisco and New York City are the most interesting. I'm basing "interesting" on the variety of things to do and the uniqueness of the cities, because that term is very vague.

I love Boston, but I've lived near it or in it my whole life and therefore find it difficult to see it's attraction as a tourist destination. I do find it interesting, but comfortable might be a more realistic description for me.
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