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> Starter Kit for Québec, "La Belle Province" unveiled
travellingjon
post May 1 2008, 09:37 PM
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LA BELLE PROVINCE, PART ONE
Québec. A land of harsh weathers, great distances, where people eat weird stuff like the infamous poutine, tourtière or shepherd’s pie. But Québec is also a cultural island in the middle of a foreign sea. Proud of their history, heritage and culture, its inhabitants are the last stand of a nation that was not meant to be.

So, nowadays, most travelers know about Montréal, by far the biggest city in the province, and of course Québec City, the proud capital which is 400 years old this very year. But besides that, what's to see and do in Québec ? Well, let's see...

Here is a short description of every regions (or cities) in Québec ; may it be of some help to the merry traveler passing by the Belle Province... Please note that I mention only a tiny fraction of what's really going on in every of the regions described. And if, after that, you still hungry for more, take a look at this Website


Québec (including Lévis) : Talking 'bout the city, here. Québec was founded by Champlain in 1608, and is (arguably, it seems) the oldest city in North America. It was the capital of the French colony (called Nouvelle-France, or New France at the time) until the Conquest of 1763. It always stayed the capital of Québec (the province), and eventually became capital of Canada for a few years in the 19th century. Now a very dynamic city of about 725'000 people, with Lévis (roughly a million in the urban area), Québec City still keeps its European touch, and is truly full of history and secrets. It is the seventh largest agglomeration in Canada.

Events taking place in Québec City :
- If you come to Québec City during winter, you can't miss the famous Carnaval de Québec (late Jan. - early Feb.). This family-friendly icefest is held every year since 1955. During the Carnaval days, you might even see a skate race competition in the streets of the old city (this is fast, believe me).
- Music and entertainment for everyone at the Festival d'Été de Québec, during summer (early July). Big shows this year (2008), as the city celebrates its 400th anniversary.
- It's now become an understatement : Quebecers love to laugh so much they decided they didn't have enough of one humor festival (Juste Pour Rire, in Montréal, that is). So in Québec City was created the Grand Rire Festival (in French), whick takes place in June every year.
- Go back in time at the Fêtes de la Nouvelle-France, see what life was like at the time of the French colonies. This is a really great event, gotta love it.
- It's summer and you want to cool yourself down ? Or it's winter and you feel like sliding down on a trip or sumthin' ? Three letters to remember : VVV, or Village Vacances Valcartier (Valcartier Holiday Village). It's the biggest amusement park in Canada, just twenty minutes north of the city.

There's also a lot more going on throughout the year. If you are the museum type, here's a link (in French) to a list of museums in Québec City.
Musées de la ville de Québec

How to move around :
- The public transit is quite efficient. Due to the town being rather much spread out (for 5 times less people in Québec City than in Montreal, it is just half the size), the Réseau de Transport de la Capitale (RTC) has an impressive fleet of more than 500 buses. It is a rather cheap way to go places (about 2.75$, one way ticket, but if you are around for a while, you might want to buy a monthly pass. Both are sold at hundred of places, such as convenient stores). Of course, you can rent a car, but I strongly suggest not to use one to go downtown, as there is almost only one-way streets.

Here are some photos I took myself of different parts of Québec City :
Pics of Québec City
And here you have photos of the Orleans Island (Île d'Orléans), just five minutes outside of town ; it was one of the first places in the area to be populated in the 17th century, and now some five thousand people live there, a very quiet place :
Pics of Île d'Orléans



Montréal (including Laval and Longueuil) : Oh yeah. The big city. Montréal has always been a destination of choice, if only for its nightlife, the European architecture (in some places) or its dynamic and diverse population. With 3.7 million people in the agglomeration, it is the biggest city in Quebec, and second in Canada, after Toronto. There's lots and lots to do in Montréal, even if you are just in for some sightseeing.

Events taking place in Montréal :
- The arts have the best part in Montréal, but one of the "must-attend" events is the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal (late June, early July). Great names of jazz music every year since 1981.
- Another now legendary attraction of Montréal in summer : the FrancoFolies de Montréal (late July / early August). Since 19 years, the best artists of Québec and the world come at this Festival, attracting near a million people every summer since its beginning.
- Le Festival Juste Pour Rire, Just For Laughs in English, is an amazing success story that is still going on. This series of humor shows now does not only welcome comics from everywhere in the world, it also has spread to other countries, like in Nantes, France.
- The world-famous Grand Prix de Montréal takes place in June every year, as part of the Formula 1 circuit, with Monaco, Monza, Sao Paulo and a bunch of others places around the planet. The fastest car races there is.
- Do you know the Habs ? Montrealers are proud (and they should be) about their hockey team, the Canadiens (which they often call the Habs). They won the Stanley Cup no less than 24 times, a league record at that, and by a long shot. From October to April (and sometimes a bit longer, depending of the team's performance in playoffs), the Canadiens play their game at the Centre Bell (Bell Center), where there's also, when the Habs are not playing, a bunch of great shows that take place all year long.
- Of course, in Montréal there's a lot more going, from January to December. Here's a list of Montréal's events and festivals (in French) : Liste Festivals & Événements Montréal
You want to go to the museum or the theater ? Well, there ya go... (still in French, though) : Liste Musées & Théâtres Montréal

How to move around :
Buses, suburban trains, metro... The choice is vast in Montreal, and everything is rather quick. The metro has four lines (blue, green, yellow and orange) and 68 stations that spread all over the city and the suburbs, even outside the island (because, you know, the city of Montréal is located on an island). As for the buses, they're just about everywhere. You can check it out and learn more here. The fares rank from 1.75$ for a reduced-price ticket, to 66$ for a monthly pass.

And here are some photos I took myself of different parts of Montréal :
Pics of Montréal



Centre du Québec (Montérégie, Mauricie, Centre-du-Québec, Estrie, Lanaudière, Laurentides) : Basically, it's the area between Québec City and Montréal. There's a few important agglomerations in this part of Québec : Trois-Rivières, in Mauricie (about 130'000), Shawinigan, just a few kilometers north of Trois-Rivières (52'000), Sherbrooke in Estrie (186'000), Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu in Montérégie (90'000), Granby and Saint-Hyacinthe, also in Montérégie (59'000 and 56'000), Drummondville in Centre-du-Québec (68'000), Repentigny in Lanaudière (78'000). It's one of the most beautiful parts of Québec, which is saying a lot. There's a bunch of nice small villages and medium towns all along the Saint-Laurent.

Events taking place in the Centre du Québec :
- Of course there's the famed Grand Prix de Montréal, but also popular in all North America is the Grand Prix de Trois-Rivières, in August. If you like the smell of fuel and burning rubber, then that's the place to go.
- Sherbrooke also has its Grand Rire Festival, (and so does Québec City, Gatineau and Ottawa), but in July. Link in French only.
- One of the great attractions in Montérégie is the Zoo de Granby and its Amazoo (water park) ; a great family time, while learning the fun way.

How to move around :
Some of the biggest towns in Centre du Québec have a public transit system (I know Trois-Rivières and Sherbrooke both do). Usually, if you come from anywhere outside the area, you will have to take the A20 (south bank of the Saint-Laurent) or the A40 (north bank). Of course there are secondary roads, like the 132, which goes just beside the river.

There are not a lot of 'em, but here are some photos I took myself of different parts of Centre du Québec :
Pics of Centre du Québec

(Scroll down for parts two and three !)
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starlagurl
post May 2 2008, 09:17 AM
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Thanks Jon, that's a great start. Most people visiting Quebec will probably stop in either one of those cities, so I think it'll help a lot!


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travellingjon
post May 4 2008, 03:39 PM
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LA BELLE PROVINCE, PART TWO
Well well... now that I've already told you about the "core" of the Québec Province (see Part One), let's talk about the "outer rim" : the North, the South, the East and the West. Those are regions that are often less visited, where a good chunk of the hidden secrets are. Meanwhile, if you are still hungry for information after that, don't forget to browse that great Website I found, just for you.


The North (Saguenay, Lac Saint-Jean, Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Nord-du-Québec) : This part of Québec is almost all about nature. Great places for breathtaking landscapes and total freedom. Though not as populated as the more southern parts of the province, the North compensate that with a tremendous sense of welcome from its warmhearted population, so those who dare walk the territory, find themselves a reward in doing so. The biggest cities are, in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, the Ville de Saguenay (an agglomeration of Jonquière, Chicoutimi and La Baie, 144'000) and Alma (32'000), in Abitibi-Témiscamingue there is Rouyn-Noranda (40'000) and Val-d'Or (32'500). The Nord-du-Québec is much less populated than any other region of the province ; there is only Chibougamau (where I live, 7'800), Lebel-sur-Quévillon (3'200) and the Cree village of Mistissini with more than three thousand people in town.

Events taking place in the North :
- Talk about an evergrowing festival : the Festival International des Rythmes du Monde takes place in Saguenay (arr. Chicoutimi) every year in early August. Since its beginning, more and more people from everywhere come to attend it.
- Also in Saguenay, the now widely acclaimed Fabuleuse Histoire d'un Royaume is presented each year since 1988. Four hundred years of history in Saguenay Lac Saint-Jean await you...
- The worldwide known Traversée du Lac Saint-Jean (54th edition in 2008) takes place every late July between the small Jeannois towns of Péribonka and Roberval ; the swimmers swim for around 40 kilometers across the wide Lac Saint-Jean. Bulgarian Petar Stoychev won the last seven editions, an all-time record.
- In late October, don't miss the Festival du Cinéma International en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, in Rouyn-Noranda. Since 1982, this international movie festival is one of the biggest to take place outside Montréal.
- Ever fancy visiting a genuine gold mine ? Well, you can, at the Cité de l'Or in Val d'Or. There's a lot to learn there, but you have to not be afraid of the dark...
- Despite the great distances and scarce population, more and more people come each year in the Chibougamau-Chapais area, for at least two reasons : the Rallye de Chibougamau, where snowmobiles race for grand prizes in February and March (43rd edition to come in early 2009, website in French only), and one of the biggest fishing contests of the province near Opemiska Lake, the Festival du Doré Baie James (James Bay Walleye Fishing Festival) in late June.

How to move around :
Most towns and cities in the North don't have public transit system, for obvious reasons (Saguenay does, though, at prices comparable to those of bigger cities). The easiest and quickest route to go to Saguenay Lac Saint-Jean, from the Montréal and Centre du Québec is through road 55 (which soon becomes 155 North (Mauricie) ; you'll end up in Chambord, in the middle of the region. Go east towards Saguenay, or west towards Lac Saint-Jean. From Québec City, take the 175 North, then stay on it for Saguenay, but take the 169 North road at the fork (around km 150 or so, on the road 175). Whether you come from Montréal or Québec City, or anywhere from the south of the province for that matter, you must take road 167 North (at the west extremity of the Lac Saint-Jean) to go to Nord-du-Québec. People coming from Montréal, prepare for a more-or-less seven to eight hours of driving to reach Chibougamau ; people coming from Québec City, it's about six to six and a halk hours. Finally, for Abitibi-Témiscamingue, if you come from Québec City of the east part of the province, you should preferably reach Montréal first ; from there, take the 15, then the 117 North to Val d'Or.

Here are some photos I took of the Nord-du-Québec, namely :
Chibougamau, the small town of Chapais, and the Cree villages of Mistissini Lake and Ouje-Bougoumou, the latter being founded quite recently, in 1992.

And here are some photos of the Saguenay Lac Saint-Jean :
Pics of Saguenay, Pics of Lac Saint-Jean. Some descriptions in English available. Unfortunately, I don't have any photos of Abitibi-Témiscamingue, for it is the one and only region in the entire province to which I have never been (though I intend to change that rather soon). In meantime, you can feast your eyes on photos taken by others.



The South (Chaudière-Appalaches, Bas Saint-Laurent) : Another underpopulated area of the province, but for different reasons. The Chaudière-Appalaches sees, since a few years, its population grow quite rapidly, due to fierce industrial development, especially in Beauce (a smaller region south of Lévis and Québec City). The Bas Saint-Laurent, though, lives now almost only of fisheries and tourism, but still it's quite a remarkable region, with great landscapes ; it is also known for its eye-popping sunsets. As you can imagine, populated agglomerations in the South a rather a rare thing ; only Montmagny (23'500), Thetford Mines (26'500) and Saint-Georges (29'000) in Chaudière-Appalaches, and Rimouski (43'000), Rivière-du-Loup (19'000) and Matane (15'000) are noticeable. However, it's in the small villages (and there's a lot of them, Amqui, Ste-Marie de Beauce, Mont-Joli, Trois-Pistoles, etc.) that the greatest part of the true beauty of these regions reside.

Events taking place in the South :
- Music lovers and peacemongers should now know about Woodstock en Beauce, a lengthy music festival with lots of reknowned artists from here and everywhere. Website in French only, as of now.
- Maybe there's no big music festivals and worldwide known attractions in Bas Saint-Laurent, but there's just so much sightseeing to do that it doesn't matter. Still not convinced ? Look at that !
- Anyway, the South part of the Québec province is just plain great to just drive around and discover old and new places by yourself. Highly recommended !

How to move around :
As far as I can tell, no city or town in the South, as I described it, has a public transit system. But it's really not a problem, as most places are rather small, and then better to be crossed by foot. There's also quite a road network down there, so it might be a good idea to bring a map along. Residents or bystayers from Montréal, it's better to reach Lévis first, before going to that area (if even you are given a choice) ; most secondary roads between the two cities are boring to say the least, and a bit too slow. From Lévis, take the 173 South for the Beauce region towards the U.S. border, and the 132 to follow the Saint-Laurent and reach the bigger (and smaller) towns of Chaudière-Appalaches and Bas Saint-Laurent towards the Gaspésie and New Brunswick.

Then again, here are some photos I took myself of regions I just don't know them as I wish I would : namely, just the small town of Amqui, in Bas Saint-Laurent. I'll add more, of more places, later !


(Scroll up for part one, down for part three !)
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travellingjon
post May 10 2008, 12:07 PM
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LA BELLE PROVINCE, PART THREE
And this is where it ends. The East and the West of the province. Let's start with the latter, shall we ?

The West (Outaouais) : I decided that Outaouais, just like Montréal and Québec, should have its own category, mainly because of the size of its largest city (Gatineau, 244'000), which is part of the agglomeration of Ottawa, capital of Canada (more than 1.1 million). The Outaouais always was a unique region in the province, more attached to the Canadian federalism than anyone else ; more than twenty thousand people work for the Canadian Governement in Gatineau). About 2/3 of the population in Outaouais are located in Gatineau ; there are many little towns between 1000 and 5000 in the region, including Papineauville and Montebello.

Events taking place in the West :
- It's not an event, but there were in the past : the famous Meech Lake, where lengthy negociations on the place of Québec in the Canadian federation took place between 1987 and 1990, is located a few minutes from Gatineau, in the Parc de la Gatineau : the lake is superb, the Parc is great, and its is one of the best attractions of the region.
- With Ottawa just on the other side of the Outaouais river, there's a lot to do around and in Gatineau, that are just a few kms away. You can find tips and good advices on Ottawa here, in starlagurl's Starter Kit for Ontario. For example, you could visit the Royal Canadian Mint tongue.gif
- If you have money to throw out the window, or if you just feel lucky, you can go to the luxurious Casino du Lac Leamy ; every year, for five evenings in August, impressive fireworks take place at the Grands Feux du Casino du Lac Leamy.

How to move around :
The Outaouais region is at a strategic corner of the country : less than an hour and half away from Montréal, more or less three to Toronto, it also is the Quebec window on Ontario, the most populated province in all Canada. From Montréal, the simplest way to go to Gatineau and access the region is to come from Autoroute 20 / road 401 (Ontario, via Ottawa). Unlike Montréal and Québec, Gatineau doesn't have an international airport, but Ottawa has one, just miles away : the MacDonald-Cartier Airport.
The Société de Transport de l'Outaouais (STO) is in charge of in-city public transportation, as well as a part of the Ottawa system, OC Transpo. It is reputed to be one of the most effective in Canada.

Here are some photos I took of the Outaouais (not a lot, but hey... better than nuffin') :
Pics of Outaouais



The East (Gaspésie-Îles-de-la-Madeleine, Côte-Nord) : Great, great places to visit in these regions ; some are oftenly showed to represent Québec's natural beauty, such as the Rocher Percé in... Percé, or the rocky coast of eastern Côte-Nord. But the population isn't large, and if Côte-Nord does a little bit better every other year, the Gaspésie-Îles-de-la-Madeleine region suffers from loss of population when the youngsters leave to find a (better) job in Québec City or Montréal. Nevertheless, the East has some of the most breathtaking landscapes in all Québec, and is definitely a must for nature lovers. Largest towns are Sept-Îles (23'300) and Baie-Comeau (22'600), and Gaspé (14'800), Sainte-Anne-des-Monts (7'000) and Chandler (8'200) in Gaspésie-Îles-de-la-Madeleine.

Events taking place in the East ::
- As nature and beautiful landscapes are the primary reasons tourists flood on this part of Québec, important events are rather scarce, but here are some tips anyway : Gaspésie has eight "Réserves Fauniques" and Parcs Nationaux (protected natural areas) ; also don't miss out the opportunity to see the famous Rocher Percé (or "Percé Rock", here's the official website.
- Gaspésie is one of the main parts of the Lighthouse Trail, due to its situation on the border of the Saint-Laurent river ; the province has 43 historic lighthouses, with Gaspésie having nearly one third of that number.
- Sept-Îles, Côte-Nord, is a sunny place : 46% of the time, there's not a cloud to be found, which ranks the town third in the province, and the largest.

How to move around :
Obviously, there's no public transportation system in any of the two regions, however it's quite easy to get there and drive around without getting lost : it's road 138 for Côte-Nord, and road 132 for Gaspésie-Îles-de-la-Madeleine (this road circles the region completely, except of course the Îles-de-la-Madeleine, which are islands only accessible by plane or boat). Whether you're coming from Ontario, the States or any other region in Québec, it's better to reach Québec City, then take the right road full east. Simple as that. Of course, there are little sideroads, which are yours to discover : some of the most gorgeous landscapes and charming villages await you beyond these roads...

Unfortunately, if you were eagerly looking for some photos I would eventually have taken from both of these regions, sorry I don't have any at the moment. How sad. Shame on me. However, see other people's photos of Gaspésie, of the Îles-de-la-Madeleine, which you may know under the name Magdalen Islands, and of the Côte-Nord. There you go.


Well, I'm done ! Feel free, though, to ask me questions, and if you're up to it, you can correct me or help me on what's already there. Thanks for your time !

Jonathan H.
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travellingjon
post May 26 2008, 03:50 PM
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BONUS FEATURES : WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW, or are just better off knowing anyway

- Quebecers like when they are spoken to... but in French, if possible : French is the official language of Québec (English is, also, but secondary), and is the mother language of 82% of the population ; except small english-speaking areas in parts of Montréal, chances are you will be adressed to in French by the common Quebecer. Knowing a few useful words of the langue de Molière will help you in any of the various situations you could encounter.

Choose when to visit : Like I said in previous posts, it is sometimes chilling cold in Québec, especially in the North and on the east coast. Also, Québec winters bring up to 4-5 meters (12-15 ft.) of snow, and though the first important snowfalls usually do not occur before early December, it can begin as early as late October (depends), and even in the southern parts like Montréal and Chaudière-Appalaches, it dwells several days through April. Summers are quite comfortable, but remember to bring along a big warm sweater or a coat for the cool summer evenings. Also, some days of the year, the whole province is almost literally closed : those are Christmas, Easter (Pâques), New Year's Day, Confederation Day (July 1), Saint-Jean-Baptiste (Fête Nationale, June 24), Thanksgiving (Action de Grâces, October), Fête des Patriotes (formerly Queen Elizabeth Day, second Monday of May) and Labor Day (Fête du Travail, first Monday of September).

How to really move around : Due to its small population, transportation system in Québec is not as developped and cheap as in, say, Europe or US east coast. So it can get quite expensive to move from one city/region to another ; also, expect to do some detours to reach some more remote places, like Nord-du-Québec or Gaspésie. On the other hand, hitch hiking is quite efficient ; having tested it between Montréal and Québec, I can say you don't have to wait a very long time before someone picks you up. I also take a lot of hitch hikers between Québec and Nord-du-Québec myself, and they all say it's a quick, fun, and obviously cheap way to go around. Careful though, it's not legal on all the roads. You can always rent a car, but as gas reach sky high prices these days, it's not always the best idea ; then again, plane fares are also sometimes, well... hyper.gif Long story short, Québec is friendly for the backpackers and those who can figure out how to get here and there no matter what. For the "wealthy", no problem too. Just don't underestimate the costs, the means and the distances.

Do not limit yourself : Montréal and Québec City are destinations of choice for the traveller, but like in almost every part of the world, you have to go outside the large cities to discover things you never heard about. Who knows, maybe it's those parts you will fall in love with...


More to come !
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starlagurl
post May 26 2008, 03:52 PM
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Haha, I like that one, especially "French people like when they are spoken to...in French"

Have you heard of Allostop? Apparently it's a really cheap way to get around Quebec... www.allostop.ca


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travellingjon
post May 26 2008, 09:18 PM
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Good call. I heard of it, but didn't remember in time to outrun you, dear starlagurl. smile.gif
Thanks for the link speak_cool.gif
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starlagurl
post May 27 2008, 09:12 AM
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I'm like a fox!


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travellingjon
post Aug 21 2008, 08:54 AM
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Hey ya !

In the past few months, I added a lot more pics for Québec in my Panoramio / Google Earth page. Feast yer eyes on this ! There are 234 of them, as of today Aug. 21, 2008.
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starlagurl
post Aug 21 2008, 09:36 AM
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Yeah, those really are beautiful. Cool.


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solaristicus
post Jun 18 2009, 05:16 PM
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I'm hoping to travel from Montreal to Quebec city by some interesting means, self-propelled. Any advice on the feasibility of walking along the river (walking or bike paths?), combined with cheap regional buses, etc? Any boats travel the distance?
thanks
rideyourbicycle@yahoo.com
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