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> Amazing nature, Eagles
mizliz
post Apr 19 2007, 12:47 AM
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We have many eagles where I live...huge, fierce looking Bald Eagles who are fascinating to watch.

Today I watched an amazing few minutes of nature taking place between a huge, mature eagle and a crow.

It's easy to spot an eagle because there are always crows flying behind them and making a horrible racket in their attempts to scare the eagle away from their nests. The eagle always gives in and flies away, when it could so easily attack and kill a much smaller crow.

But today I discovered that this is easier said than done. The eagle was being chased away by a lone crow...the other crows had abandoned the fight...but this time the eagle got angry and took off after the crow. Time after time the eagle circled back and positioned itself above the crow and swooped down to attack it, and time after time the wily crow escaped the outstretched talons of the eagle. This continued for at least five minutes and I was cheering for the eagle, not being at all fond of crows, but the eagle eventually gave up and flew away.

This was an absolutely fascinating show...
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ScottWoz
post Apr 19 2007, 03:50 AM
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Interesting story Liz. I watched an outdoor birds of prey demonstration a couple of weeks ago at a sanctuary in Victoria and was blown away by the speed and accuracy of some of these birds. One - I think it was the Peregrine Falcon (don't quote me on this) - got up to ridiculous speeds, like 180mph or something. They're amazing, all of them..


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wakingdream
post Apr 19 2007, 09:34 AM
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The soaring condors (with 5 meter wing spans) gliding through the Colca Canyon's Condor's Pass. One of the most amazing things I have seen yet....

The other day I was out for a walk and this beautiful, red breasted Robin flew right by my face, chest spread proud, wings out, soaring by, a lovely little vision, just for a split second, and then he was gone. I love moments like that.

There's nothing like seeing an eagle soar. It's one of those things you just have to stop and watch. They're so mesmerizing.

Caged birds. Now there's an awful sight.


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mizliz
post Apr 19 2007, 10:16 PM
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QUOTE(wakingdream @ Apr 19 2007, 09:34 AM) *

The soaring condors (with 5 meter wing spans) gliding through the Colca Canyon's Condor's Pass. One of the most amazing things I have seen yet....

The other day I was out for a walk and this beautiful, red breasted Robin flew right by my face, chest spread proud, wings out, soaring by, a lovely little vision, just for a split second, and then he was gone. I love moments like that.

There's nothing like seeing an eagle soar. It's one of those things you just have to stop and watch. They're so mesmerizing.

Caged birds. Now there's an awful sight.
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whereshegoes
post Apr 19 2007, 10:20 PM
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Well said, Mizliz, well said. wink.gif


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mizliz
post Apr 19 2007, 10:27 PM
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QUOTE(mizliz @ Apr 19 2007, 10:16 PM) *

QUOTE(wakingdream @ Apr 19 2007, 09:34 AM) *

The soaring condors (with 5 meter wing spans) gliding through the Colca Canyon's Condor's Pass. One of the most amazing things I have seen yet....

The other day I was out for a walk and this beautiful, red breasted Robin flew right by my face, chest spread proud, wings out, soaring by, a lovely little vision, just for a split second, and then he was gone. I love moments like that.

There's nothing like seeing an eagle soar. It's one of those things you just have to stop and watch. They're so mesmerizing.

Caged birds. Now there's an awful sight.



Thanks for joining me...I fully agree that caged birds is an awful sight.

Actually, to me, any caged animal is something I don't want to see. On a trip once we saw a brown bear, chained to a stake in the ground outside a shop, for the entertainment of their customers. This poor bear was so dejected and sad looking, deprived of its' freedom and natural surroundings, so disturbed me I longed to untie it and let it go free. This cruelty should never be allowed.
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findingnine
post Apr 20 2007, 01:33 AM
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I have a tendancy to describe things that are so beautiful, I could not concieve of altering them, as a 'flower in the woods'. That is to say, it needs to be appreciated how it is, because it cannot be taken away without taking away what makes it beautiful. I aim to appreciate rather than to consume.

I have to confess, my eye is atleast as captured by the everyday nature as the extreme. The simple pleasure of trees and clouds and the moon etc, because wherever you go, you can find reminders of home in them. And vice versa when you return. Plus, I Love trees! They are all beautiful and smell and feel and...! Love em!


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wakingdream
post Apr 20 2007, 07:37 AM
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QUOTE
I have to confess, my eye is atleast as captured by the everyday nature as the extreme. The simple pleasure of trees and clouds and the moon etc, because wherever you go, you can find reminders of home in them. And vice versa when you return. Plus, I Love trees! They are all beautiful and smell and feel and...! Love em!


Everyday nature is the essence of life. I think sometimes people think I'm a bit, uh, odd, b/c I get so taken with the sky. Sunsets, sunrises, regular cloud movement, fast cloud movement, cloud shapes, the thick, fluffiness of them, the dark ones which play over the moon at night. It's all so beautiful it's hard not to get totally carried away.

I love trees too. Seeing the giant redwoods in California was truly phenomenal! Wow! I have never seen such massive trees in my life.

Animals for amusement. Now there's a topic that gets me pretty frustrated I've seen it alot, and I've worked with animals that have been taken out of situations like this as well. There are different factors, but I think education plays a part in it. Sometimes though, you have got to wonder that if we all have hearts inside us, then how could we think tying up an animal for amusement is a good idea.


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findingnine
post Apr 20 2007, 11:35 AM
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I'm not convinced that the confinement of animals is intrinsically bad. I do feel it is abundantly important to care for them on their terms though.
The world can be a vicious place sometimes, (for them And us). Escaping these pressures to just make it at all may not be so bad. I feel it is possible to be a caretaker without being an oppresser.
Ok, I know, a little off the amazing nature topic, so the obigatory justification comment. Just because something is captured does not make it less natural. While it's surroundings may be compromised, perhaps lametably so, We can still see the beauty of the animal. Your caged bird is no less amazing than the free one, but adimittedly sad to see.

River Valleys are also everywhere, and delight me plenty as well. The rock and dirt, whether walled or sloped, wooded or barren ( I like the trees), the scents that blow throw on the wind...Wind must get thirsty too! It always finds its way to water. What was I saying?


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wakingdream
post Apr 20 2007, 12:01 PM
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QUOTE
I'm not convinced that the confinement of animals is intrinsically bad. I do feel it is abundantly important to care for them on their terms though.


Human overpopulation. We've pushed, and are still pushing animals out of their natural habitats and to the point of extinction and beyond.

People have become so accustomed to seeing caged animals that they think it is normal and natural. I would disagree. It is not natural for a wild animal to live in a cage. or tied up. It is anything but. I think we have put too many species at risk b/c of our actions as humans.

I'd say that in the situation mizliz described the bear to be in, well that's just nasty. There are certainly many humane ways that animals are kept. I admire people that work with different species in the name of science and for the animals beneift, not the humans, to try to ensure longer, healthier lives for them, and to learn more about the animal so we can help them live out their lives in their natural habitats as peacefully as possible.

There are definitely situations where an animal must be caged. I do have to say though that alot of the time the 'must' comes around b/c of some action by some human.

Sorry to go off topic there.....


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findingnine
post Apr 20 2007, 12:31 PM
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All fair. Infact a thread about amazing nature might be incomplete without mention of the stewadship of these wonders. How involved to get, or Not get is important. If we truly appreciate the many impessive creatures and places about the earth, then it is good to be deliberate in our decisions that impact their continued presence. And as you pointed out Susie, impact we do. Some times less is more. I do not advocate cages and tying up [animals] as a rule. Sancuaries on the other hand offer something to the animal, as well as awareness and the opportunity to appreciate to us. Intent. The intent must surely be for the animals benefit first.

To be fair though, ask this. Do pet owner possess animals for the animals sake or their own. The responsibily to care for the animal on it's own terms, physically and relationally, is just as important. Let's be honest though, the choice to own animals is seldom philanthopic. (I know that's the wrong word, but it's early and you get the idea.)


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wakingdream
post Apr 20 2007, 01:24 PM
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QUOTE
To be fair though, ask this. Do pet owner possess animals for the animals sake or their own. The responsibily to care for the animal on it's own terms, physically and relationally, is just as important.


Ha! I knew you were going to bring that up! Good one.

Going way back to, well, way back, I think it was definitely the persons intent to possess the animals for their own (possibly, most probably selfish) reasons. Things are a bit different now. Why keep breeding animals when there are millions upon millions of domesticated dogs, cats etc that are now homeless b/c someone bought them on a whim and now they are no longer wanted? WHY? I keep asking this question. I have trudged through days and days of working at the local S.P.C.A. I know what it's like for animals to live there. Yes they are cared for well, but it's traumatic for them to live amongst each other when they are all so stressed out, not exercised properly b/c of lack of manpower and $$. To possibly not be one of the chosen ones and have his/her life taken from them b/c of the selfishness of humans, well, it's awful.

Sooo, you could say that perhaps in certain situations, saving an animal is a good thing and it is for the betterment of that animal's life and not necessarily the humans although the human will no doubt benefit from the unconditional love it will surely recieve. There will always be a selfish aspect to it though, b/c all we people want is to be loved, don't we?

If only we would all apot the unwanteds and stop the unecessary breeding to get all these "show" dogs "we" can walk around with. It's like having the nicest, fastest car. It's all a show with alot of people. Animals aren't for show. They are animals. I once helped with fundraiser and did a shoot for the SPCA. People in the dog's cages instead of the dogs. Turned out quite well and I think it definitely had an impact.


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mizliz
post Apr 20 2007, 10:54 PM
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Here on Canada's west coast we don't have to travel far from cities and towns to be in the middle of nature in the wild.

As more and more people come here to live, and the demand for ski hills, homes, hiking and dirt bike trails grows ever larger and takes over more of the animals' territories, we have seen many more bears, coyotes and even deer spotted on our surbuban streets. Bears are the worst culprits by far.

For years bears found in peoples' yards or ambling down a street were shot by conservation officers, but lately a very successful movement has started wherein we try not to kill these magnificent animals unless they threaten humans. We are taught that we should never leave garbage cans outdoors overnight, to pick up our fallen fruit, to not feed our pets outdoors, even bird feeders are discouraged, and slowly people are beginning to follow this plan so that there are far fewer bears shot nowadays. Sometimes bears are trapped by placing food in a huge barrel shaped container and drugged until they can be moved far away, but this isn't successful because bears always return to their familiar territories, so it is up to humans to take responsibility for invading their territory and to not tempt them to sniff out an easy meal in our back yards.
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wakingdream
post Apr 23 2007, 10:27 AM
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It's all about education isn't it? Instead of killling what threatens us, it's important to know why and how they are threatened by us and what makes them tick so we can avoid confrontation as much as possible and live harmoniously as possible with wildlife. I think sometimes people forget that we must share our planet with wildlife, that it's not just ours for the taking and that we are not the only ones with the privilege to be here.

The robin I wrote about in a previous post? Well this w/e I found a lovely red breasted robin...dead in my backyard, no doubt by one of our cats. Quintin is quite the little hunter. It's difficult sometimes to accept nature as it is. I buried the little guy all the while wondering if he was the same little guy who flew by me, so close to my face the week before... unsure.gif


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findingnine
post Apr 23 2007, 11:07 PM
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QUOTE(wakingdream @ Apr 20 2007, 01:24 PM) *
Ha! I knew you were going to bring that up! Good one.

QUOTE(wakingdream @ Apr 23 2007, 10:27 AM) *
Quintin is quite the little hunter.


Ha Ha, a pet owner. It all makes sense now. Cats? Seriously.


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mizliz
post Apr 23 2007, 11:20 PM
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Wakingdream, life is often very cruel for wild animals isn't it...most wild animals have one or many predators always seeking a good meal, and when they spot their prey they never hesitate to go after and kill it, often after playing with it for a long time making the poor victim so exhausted it can no longer run away.

I can think of very few wild animals who don't have to worry about predators...elephants, lions, rhinos, large sharks, and there may be more I can't think of right now, but it seems an animal needs to be either very large or very swift to not have another animal eyeing it for dinner.

Once when we had a cat, he would stalk and kill birds and drag the corpse back into the house to show off his prize. Horrors, this always made me feel sick to see. This cat would also catch mice and snakes, again bringing their gift to us into the house, and I got to the point of dreading having a cat around, not prepared or willing to be gifted with these wonderful prizes. When the cat died he wasn't replaced because we were all disgusted with his behaviour, even knowing that it is his instinct to pursue small creatures. Even belling this cat didn't help as he soon learned to walk even more stealthily towards his potential victims. Cats can be very cruel and I much prefer dogs for pets.

You are right...education is the best means of making people realize that we are all living beings wanting to live in peace. I am very grateful that this relatively new bear education was made available to us, and that most people are taking steps to ensure that we can.
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findingnine
post Apr 23 2007, 11:24 PM
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Now if only ravens weren't so smart. All the best trash containment, and they manage to drag it out anyway, drawing other animals around. I guess even so called pests can be pretty amazing. They sure do make short work of the road kill along the highway. It impresses me that the blood can still be on the highway and the carcass in the ditch can be picked beyond recognition. Very efficient!


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mizliz
post Apr 23 2007, 11:41 PM
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Here in Vancouver we now have a "no kill" policy for unwanted pets in our area who are turned into the various animal welfare units. At one time an unwanted pet was given a short time to be adopted, and if that didn't happen the animal was euthanized. This resulted in many beautiful animals being destroyed in the prime of their lives. How cruel.

Now we give more emphasis to educating people to have their pets neutered, which makes much more sense and is far kinder. All pets who are taken in by pounds or the SPCA are neutered before they are adopted out. If a facility has an excess of animals they are shifted to another place that has room for them. Pets who aren't adopted over time stay in their facilities for life, always treated well so they don't suffer. Only vicious animals are destroyed.

But every pet longs for a home of its' own. You can see it on their faces if you visit any pet facility. The eagerness with which they look at you with a pleading in their eyes to please take me, I will try to behave and make you love me, just breaks my heart. Ensuring that there are fewer and fewer pets having to face this reality is the very best thing we can do for them.
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findingnine
post Apr 23 2007, 11:44 PM
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Now That's Amazing. How do they DO that. I always thought they'd run out of room. Are people finally catching on?


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wakingdream
post Apr 24 2007, 08:58 AM
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QUOTE
Horrors, this always made me feel sick to see. This cat would also catch mice and snakes, again bringing their gift to us into the house, and I got to the point of dreading having a cat around, not prepared or willing to be gifted with these wonderful prizes. When the cat died he wasn't replaced because we were all disgusted with his behaviour, even knowing that it is his instinct to pursue small creatures. Even belling this cat didn't help as he soon learned to walk even more stealthily towards his potential victims. Cats can be very cruel and I much prefer dogs for pets.


I don't know, I don't see it as cruelty. I see it as instinct and it's natural and we have to accept it. It can be awful to witness, I agree, but I think seeing this instinct in cats makes me feel good that they haven't been domesticated so much that they are lacking natural instinct.

I've also seen some hunting dogs kill birds more viciously then a cat! Yikes!

QUOTE
Ha Ha, a pet owner. It all makes sense now. Cats? Seriously.

Yup, a pet owner. All adopted from the SPCA ofcourse. The only one I'd say I really own "own" is the dog as he doesn't wander totally freely. The cats seem to like running their own lives! One day, I would love to live on a farm in the country....

QUOTE
If a facility has an excess of animals they are shifted to another place that has room for them. Pets who aren't adopted over time stay in their facilities for life, always treated well so they don't suffer. Only vicious animals are destroyed


That's amazing. I wish our community had the funds, therefore the ability to keep these animals alive.


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