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> Australia's National Parks
introducinlyric
post Aug 19 2009, 06:39 AM
Post #1


Rolling Stone
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Group: Local Expert
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Joined: 24-May 07
From: Sydney, Australia
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I decided to post a list of National Parks found in Australia, as there are far too many for me to list all of them i just, rather randomly picked a select few and have placed links to relevant websites where you can find more info. if you want to add some more yourself feel free too.

New South Wales

Toonumbar National Park
Toonumbar National Park is located in the Richmond Range and contains two World Heritage listed rainforests, the Murray Scrub and the Dome Mountain Forest. The region is noted for its unique and complex natural environment. Much of this complexity is due to activity associated with the Focal Peak Volcano which was active some 23 Million years ago.

Extensive subtropical rainforests protect threatened plants and animals, including the sooty owl, red-legged pademelon and yellow-bellied glider. The rainforests of Dome Mountain and the Murray Scrub are part of the World Heritage-listed Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves of Australia. The rainforests are only one facet of this wild and intricate natural environment and you will be inspired by its rugged landscape.

Toonumbar National Park is a relatively new park with excellent opportunities for bushwalking, picnicking, car touring and camping.


Boonoo Boonoo National Park
Boonoo Boonoo National Park is situated on 4377 hectares and is 26 kilometres north east of Tenterfield off Woodenbong Road.

Scenic Boonoo Boonoo River has a 210 metre fall and rainforest filled gorge. Bushwalking, swimming and bush camping are among the attractions of this
area. The diversity of natural features combined to offer a compelling bush location.
A picnic area with amenities is located at the top of the falls and a short distance up stream the top swimming hole is popular during summer months.

Camping is available at Cypress Rest Area - Day visit $7.00 per car - pay once and visit both Bald Rock and Falls - Camping $3.50 per person per night.
Adjoining Bald Rock National Park and Woollool Woollool Aboriginal Culture Tours visit this park everyday.



Macquarie Pass National Park
Macquarie Pass National Park, part of the Illawarra escarpment south of Sydney provides some magnificent scenery and displays untouched rainforest, covering 1064 hectares.
Visitors can view nature at its best, beautiful satin bowerbirds and lyre birds as well as swamp wallabies and wombats. With lots of diverse bird and
mammal population. It contains a diverse range of habitats and wildlife including several rare and threatened plant and animal species.

The steep sandstone ridges and gullies are topped by cliffs, and the park supports heathland, woodland, tall open forest and significant rainforest areas. It is an excellent bushwalking and picnicking area, with spectacular scenery and waterfalls.


Mount Kaputar National Park
Mount Kaputar National Park consists of a gathering of sharp peaks and rocky ranges, the remnants of a 17 million year old volcano. Millions of years of erosion have carved this volcanic pile into the Nandewar Range, with its dramatic landscape of lava terraces, volcanic plugs and ring dykes. At the peak of the range is Mt Kaputar, which reaches an altitude of 1510 metres. From the summit it’s possible to take in 360 degree views encompassing one tenth of New South Wales.

With 11 walks available (most offering spectacular views), the National Park is popular with rockclimbers.
The park protects a wide variety of plant communities. Wildflowers in spring provide a magnificent display. It's home to many animal species, and provides a haven for many threatened species - including bats, birds, wallabies, quolls and a unique large pink slug, which often appears after rain.



Jervis Bay National Park
NSW Jervis Bay National Park lies on 4,211 hectares. Sections of the park fringe Jervis Bay, St George Basin and ocean beaches. The area is rich in Aboriginal heritage, including important wetlands, abd preserves a flourishing diversity of plants and animals. The park lies next to the Commonwealth-managed Jervis Bay National Park which is now called Booderee National Park.

The forests, bays and beaches are great for swimming, bushwalking, birdwatching or enjoying the tranquility.
Greenfield Beach has visitor facilities including wheelchair access to the beach. From here you can follow the information signs on the White Sands Walk along the coast to Hyams Beach and return by the Scribbly Gum Track.
On the northern side of the bay, Hammerhead Point and Red Point have picnic areas.

Camping is not permitted in the park.


Wadbilliga National Park
An area of mountainous wilderness cradling one of NSW's largest undisturbed
river catchments. A 3 kilometres walk extends from Cascades to Tuross Falls.
You can camp at Lake Creek or Cascades and picnic at Wadbilliga Crossing.

The park is approximately 400 kilometres south of Sydney and east of Cooma.

Accommodation is available at nearby towns, Cooma & Nimmitabel.
The park covers an area of 76,399 hectares and includes the Brogo wilderness
area, Wadbilliga national park protects the rugged coastal escarpment and
plateau areas surrounding the Wadbilliga, Tuross and Brogo rivers. The park is
a perfect area for long walks and overnight camping.

Basic camping facilities are available and the park offers picnicking and
camping opportunities. There is a walking track to Tuross falls from the
cascades camping area, 30/40 minutes walk to viewing point.

Access by car from Countegany and Cobargo along the Princes Highway.
Disabled access: no facilities for disabled or access by wheelchair as track
is too rough, however cascades could be viewed.


Royal National Park
Royal National Park is situated on 15,080 hectares and was the second national park in the world. Walk the coast for magnificent views, or experience the variety of habitats, including heath, rainforests, open woodlands and estuarine systems.
Enjoy historic landscapes and short walks to lookouts with spectacular views over the park. Wattamolla, Garie and Burning Palms are some of the most beautiful beaches in Australia.

Hire a row boat at Audley and take a leisurely paddle up Kangaroo Creek.
There are kiosks at Garie, Wattamolla and Audley. Bonnie Vale camping ground provides basic facilities (fees apply), other camping sites are limited with bookings and permits essential.

Visit the Visitors Centre for maps, brochures and information on things to see and do in the national park. Take a Discovery Ranger guided tour to learn more about the national park.

There is over a 100 kilometres of walking tracks including the 26 kilometres coast walk from Bundeena to Otford, Uloola Falls, Karloo Pools, Lady Carrington Walk (9.6 kilometres one way), Burning Palms and The Garawarrah Farm to Era Track.
Activities: Swimming, surfing, canoeing, beach fishing, bushwalking, bush camping and nature.


Dorrigo National Park
Included on the World Heritage List in 1986, Dorrigo National Park is recognised as an area of exceptional natural beauty with significant habitats of outstanding universal value to science and conservation. One of Australia's most accessible World Heritage rainforests, the Park provides all visitors with an opportunity to experience and appreciate this unique environment.

Venture our on the Skywalk (70 metres, level) and Walk with the Birds (500 metres return with seating provided). Both are wheelchair accessible. Picnic with the brush turkeys at The Glade, and visit the Dorrigo Rainforest Centre and the Canopy Cafe. There are more challenging bushwalks at Never Never picnic area. Discovery tours are also frequently available


Blue Mountains National Park
The World Heritage listed Blue Mountains National Park is situated on 266,859 hectares and is located approximately 110 kilometres west of Sydney. More than three million people come to Blue Mountains National Park each year. For many, it's enough just to find a lookout and gaze across the park's chiselled sandstone outcrops and hazy blue forests. Others walk or cycle along the cliff-tops and in the valleys, following paths that were created for Victorian-era honeymooners, or discovered by Aboriginal hunters many thousands of years ago. Over 140 km of walking tracks of all grades (some accessible for people with a disability) in diverse settings make the Blue Mountains a bushwalker's paradise.

This park, which is part of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, protects an unusually diverse range of vegetation communities. There are rare and ancient plants and isolated animal populations tucked away in its deep gorges. This is a vast and special place.
Ridges that overlap into the hazy blue distance, chiselled sandstone outcrops,endless forests clinging somehow to bare rock, plunging waterfalls - the
landscape of Blue Mountains National Park isn't easily forgotten.

Blue Mountains National Park offers panoramic views from famous lookouts and waterfalls at Govett's Leap (Blackheath), Echo Point (Katoomba), and
Wentworth Falls. The park offers a variety of activities including, camping, lookouts, bushwalking, rockclimbing, swimming, Aboriginal sites and picnics
areas.




Victoria


Ararat Hills Regional Park

The ancient hills in this regional park offer beautiful panoramic views of the surrounding area. To the west is Grampians National Park and to the east Ararat, Green Hills Lake and Mount Langi Ghiran. The Ararat Regional Park sets aside 1000 ha for visitors to enjoy activities such as walking, picnicking, driving, cycling and nature study in attractive forest settings


Baw Baw National Park
The 13,300 ha Baw Baw National Park covers a substantial part of the Baw Baw Plateau and sections of the Thomson and Aberfeldy River valleys. One of the two Victorian national parks with large areas of sub-alpine vegetation, it offers outstanding views, colourful wildflowers in early summer and open grassy plains with Snow Gum woodlands.


Chiltern-Mt Pilot National Park
This, recently expanded, 21,600ha park is located between Beechworth and the low hills surrounding Chiltern and includes the striking Mt Pilot Range and Woolshed Falls. Chiltern-Mt Pilot National Park protects box-ironbark forest that once covered much of north-east Victoria and contains several historic goldmining sites. Short or day-long walks can be made on vehicle tracks through open forest and a 25km historic drive is marked from Chiltern through the forest and goldfields.


Grampians National Park
The Grampians National Park is one of Victoria’s most popular holiday destinations. Renowned for its breathtaking rocky views, rich Aboriginal culture, European heritage and stunning spring wildflower displays, there is plenty to see and do in this rugged ancient landscape. Declared in 1984, the 168,000 hectare National park is home to a rich diversity of plants and animals, many of which are endemic to the park.
Hosting over 1 million visitors each year, popular activities include bushwalking, camping, picnicking, nature study, rock-climbing, bike riding and fishing. The extensive network of roads makes car touring to surrounding villages another great way to explore.



Mornington Peninsula National Park
The Mornington Peninsula National Park has long been a favourite for summer holidays. Its diverse coastal environments range from the basalt cliffs at Cape Schanck to the native bushland of Greens Bush and the roaring surf of Gunnamatta


Ninety Mile Beach Marine National Park

Covering 2,750 hectares and five kilometres of coastline, this park is located 30 kilometres south of Sale adjacent to the Gippsland Lakes Coastal Park. The calcarenite reefs here are dominated by invertebrates including sponges, ascidians, bryozoans, hydroids and soft coral. The unusual soft coral (Pseudogorgia godeffroyi) is only found in Victoria between McGuarans and Delray beaches. The Ninety-Mile Beach area has been found to have the highest species diversity anywhere on the planet. In ten square metres 860 species were discovered living in the sand and in one square metre a staggering 187 species.
Victoria's Ninety Mile Beach lies on the edge of a long slender sand dune, thrown up from the sea by the easterly waves and protecting the Gippsland Lakes. Offshore, beneath the water, vast plains of sand stretch in every direction. Yet these areas are not as monotonous as they might first appear as there are local variations. Sand particles are sorted into different groups and layers according to the waves and currents, while there are different surface features, such as mounds and ripples, as a result of animal and wave action.
The fine sands of East Gippsland appear to harbour more animals per square metre than most other marine habitats in the world. This great diversity is derived from the myriad of small creatures that call this area home. Creatures that burrow into the sand build tiny tubes or scurry around eating the scraps of food that may drift by. Larger animals are far fewer in number. To conserve their energy and retain access to oxygenated water, animals like crabs, octopuses, brittle stars and shrimp do not burrow very deep.
There are no rocky headlands or platforms along this coast. Offshore, the sandy plains are only occasionally broken by low ribbons of reef which formed as shorelines or sand dunes during ice-ages when the sea-level was lower than today. Even these reefs are periodically covered by sand, shifted around by the strong tidal currents. These reefs do not support the large brown seaweeds characteristic of many Victorian reefs, but instead are covered by resilient red seaweeds and encrusting animals that can survive the sandy environment. Despite their small size and transient nature, these reefs almost certainly play an important role connecting populations of reef animals from rocky areas around Wilsons Promontory to those of Victoria's far east.
There are plenty of fish too and many feed on the seafloor smorgasbord of tiny animals. Schools of pelagic fish like pike, school whiting and snapper are common and the area appears to be a nursery ground for sharks. Young Great White Sharks can be found in the area chasing snapper, one of their favourite foods.



Point Nepean National Park
Point Nepean is a popular tourist destination renowned for its historic features, outstanding coastal scenery and panoramic views of Bass Strait, the Rip and Port Phillip Bay. Point Nepean has a long history of use by indigenous people and contains a wide number of aboriginal archaeological sites. The density of sites is amongst the highest in Victoria. Historic Point Nepean has old fortifications interpreted by displays and soundscapes, and spectacular views of the Port Phillip Heads.




Queensland


Barron Gorge National Park
Barron Gorge National Park has great cultural and historical significance, with dramatic scenery and World Heritage-listed rainforest. The local Aboriginal people developed trails through the area, which later became the first pack routes used by Europeans to link the hinterland goldfields to the coast. Today, you can walk the same trails for pleasure! Walk to a lookout to view Barron Falls (spectacular after good rainfall). Take the Skyrail cableway for views over the forest canopy and out to the coast. Jump aboard the famous Kuranda railway as it winds past ravines and picturesque waterfalls. Explore the rainforest along the walking tracks from Speewah or Kamerunga. Join a white-water rafting tour for an up-close experience of the river.


Simpson Desert National Park
Spanning 1,012,000 hectares in the arid outback, this is Queensland's largest protected area. Parallel wind-blown sand dunes dominate the striking landscape. Some extend 200 kilometres and reach 90 metres high. Saltpans and gibber-ironstone flats occupy interdunal areas. More than 180 species of birds, including the Eyrean grasswren, and numerous mammals and reptiles live in the park.
Wildflowers are prolific after good rains. Visit Big Red, the largest sand dune. At Poeppels Corner, attempt to stand in two states and a territory at once. Camp and admire the expansive night sky and make sure you take binoculars and a camera!


Boodjamulla (Lawn Hill) National Park
Boodjamulla (Lawn Hill) National Park is one of Queensland's most scenic national parks, featuring spectacular gorge country, sandstone ranges and significant fossils. The Waanyi Aboriginal people have strong cultural ties with the park, while pastoralists of European descent have recent historical connections. Visit the World Heritage-listed Riversleigh fossil site. Numerous freshwater springs feed Lawn Hill Creek.
Camp beside the creek and canoe its cool reaches. Attractive purple-crowned fairy-wrens may be seen along the creek edge. Enjoy one of the many walks that vary in length, difficulty and landscape. Cross the bridge and walk to the Wild Dog Dreaming Aboriginal art shelters. Continue on to the lower gorge where freshwater crocodiles are often spotted basking in the sun. (They can become aggressive if disturbed. Take care if swimming.)


Noosa National Park
Noosa National Park, a chunk of wild coastline jutting into the ocean, is understandably one of Australia's most visited parks. Wallum heaths, woodlands and pockets of rainforest with hoop and kauri pine are important refuges for wildlife, including koalas and rare glossy black-cockatoos. Explore the picturesque Noosa Headland along a selection of five tracks, ranging from one kilometre to eight kilometres and catering to all fitness levels. Walk past rocky shorelines and spiky pandanus, through woodlands and rainforests with piccabeen palms, to wide beaches or lofty lookouts. In the Peregian section, stroll to the ocean beach. In the Emu Mountain section, on your way to the summit, discover wildflowers. In the East Weyba section, along unmarked vehicle trails, watch for birds - but keep to the trails at all times.


Cania Gorge National Park
Towering, ochre-coloured sandstone cliffs, gorges, caves and amazing walks are just some of the attractions of Cania Gorge National Park. Find out about the park's wildlife, vegetation and history at the main picnic area beside pretty Three Moon Creek. Bushwalkers can choose from walks of varying length and difficulty. The longest track, a 5.6 kilometre loop, takes in the Giant's Chair lookout and offers excellent views. A short walk from the carpark leads to mining relics at the historic Shamrock goldmine site. Watch for platypus in the creek.


Jardine River National Park and Heathlands Resources Reserve
Jardine River National Park and Heathlands Resources Reserve is a true wilderness at the tip of remote Cape York Peninsula. It includes much of the catchment of the Jardine River, Queensland's largest perennial river. Heath, rainforest and woodland cover low sandy ridges separated by swamps. Shrublands and vine thickets cover massive coastal dunes. A rich Aboriginal cultural landscape, the parks also have colourful European historical links. Bush camp at Eliot Falls, Captain Billy Landing or beside the Jardine River. Take short walks along the creeks at Eliot and Fruit Bat falls, to view crystal-clear water and striking waterfalls. Look for carnivorous pitcher plants and delicate sundews along moist creek margins. At Captain Billy Landing, explore remote scenic beaches.


Palmerston, Wooroonooran National Park
Palmerston, Wooroonooran National Park is one of the most accessible parts of a large park in the heart of the World Heritage area. Access points along the highway allow walkers to visit rivers and waterfalls surrounded by dense, ancient rainforest. Towering buttressed trees and small rainforest cycads are prominent features. Stop at Crawfords lookout for the view down to the North Johnstone River. Climb down the steep winding track for a closer look. Camp at Henrietta Creek and go platypus spotting. Take the circuit track to Nandroya Falls or walk to Tchupala and Wallicher falls. Relax by the creek at Goolagan's picnic area. Go white-water rafting with a rafting company on the North Johnstone River.



South Australia


Belair National Park
Only a 25-minute drive from Adelaide in the picturesque Adelaide Hills, South Australia's oldest park is a favourite with locals and a world away from the hustle and bustle of city life.
Belair includes more than 50 bushland tennis courts, several ovals, grassy picnic areas, gas barbecues and even a golf course and caravan park nearby.
There's an adventure playground that will keep kids entertained for hours, with a huge wooden fort, tunnels and poles on which to balance.
Heritage pavilions and an ornamental lake add to Belair's nostalgic charm, as does an avenue of heritage-listed trees leading to Old Government House. Guided tours are available Sunday afternoons and by appointment.
Be on the lookout for koalas in the trees, admire wildflowers on the ground or visit the lovely State Flora Belair Nursery or enjoy a leisurely stroll or bike ride around Playford Lake.


Flinders Ranges National Park
The Flinders Ranges National is one of South Australia's most popular destinations. This area is world-renowned for its geological history, Aboriginal rock art sites, impressive fossil remains and its ruins of early European settlement.
Aborigines have lived in the Flinders Ranges for tens of thousands of years. For the Adnyamathanha - the hills or rock people, the ranges are still of immense cultural significance. While geologists use science to explain the formation of the Flinders, the Adnyamathanha people understand the land through their Yura Muda stories, which endow the physical features of the ranges with spiritual meaning.
The park is located in the Flinders Ranges between the townships of Hawker and Blinman. The park offers a wide range of activities for all interests including bushwalking, camping, scenic touring, bird watching and Aboriginal and European cultural experiences.



Lake Eyre National Park
If you're looking for a real Outback adventure, Lake Eyre is the place. Huge and remote, the vast expanse of the shimmering white salt plain is matched in intensity only by the impossibly blue desert sky.
While the lake has only filled three times to capacity in the past 150 years, it partially fills on average every eight years, turning the lake into a birdwatchers' paradise. How these birds know the desert is flooded remains a mystery.
Day visitor access to Lake Eyre north is via Muloorina Station. Camping and day visits are also available at Halligan Bay about 67 kilometres from the Oodnadatta Track, near William Creek.
The best time to visit is between April and October. Lake Eyre National Park is open to four-wheel drives only and travellers must be well prepared, carrying extra fuel, food, water and suitable communications. Driving on the lake's surface is not permitted.


Mount Remarkable National Park
Mount Remarkable National Park, in the Southern Flinders Ranges, offers visitors a true wilderness experience within easy reach of Adelaide. Dramatic mountain scenery and natural diversity of the park make it a great location for camping, bushwalking and a wide range of recreational activities.
The 16,000 hectare park stretches from the coastal plain on the western side of the Flinders Ranges to the foothills above Wilmington. Its geographical location makes it a key conservation area with an intriguing mix of flora and fauna from both environments.
Hikers can take in be beauty of the bush and stay overnight at secluded campsites, strategically located throughout the park. Camping grounds cabin are available at Mambray Creek in the park, while a charming self-contained lodge is available at Alligator Gorge, (bookings essential).
You can access the park from the towns of Wilmington, Mambray Creek and Melrose.



Vulkathunha Gammon Ranges National Park
Vulkathunha-Gammon Ranges National Park lies approximately 750 kilometres to the north of Adelaide and 110 kilometres from Leigh Creek. The park comprises arid wilderness with rugged, spectacular scenery, interesting wildlife and a wealth of Adnyamathanha Aboriginal culture and European heritage. The Gammons also offer challenging bushwalking experiences and cottage accommodation.
The Vulkathunha-Gammon Ranges National Park will be closed to public access for feral animal control to protect the Yellow-footed Rock-wallaby as part of Bounceback from: 6am Sunday 23 August 2009 until 6pm Friday 28 August 2009.



Witjira National Park
Witjira National Park covers 7,770 square kilometres of gibber, sand dunes, stony tablelands and floodplain country on the western edge of the Simpson Desert in the far north of South Australia. It is truly spectacular country with vast landscapes including many areas of considerable archaeological, biological and geological interest.
The attraction of the Dalhousie mound springs, combined with some delightful camping spots and upgraded visitor facilities, make Witjira one of the most popular Desert Parks, particularly with family groups.
The springs are home to unique species of fish such as the Lake Eyre hardy-head and other rare aquatic life.
The park is part of the lands associated with the Lower Southern Arrernte, Wangkangurru, and Arabunna people who in 1989 formed the Irrwanyere Aboriginal Corporation, which manages the park jointly with us.
A Desert Parks Pass or entry pass is required to enter the park



Northern Territory


Kakadu National Park
Three hours drive east of Darwin is the famed, World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park - a spectacular collection of woodlands, forests, the majestic Arnhem Land escarpment, Waterways and floodplains, all home to an incredible array of wildlife.
It is Australia's largest national park, but it isn't just the size that astounds visitors - it is the sense of something very old and grand. Creation of the 500 km escarpment began 2,000 million years ago, when layers of sandstone built up a plateau to later be carved into an escarpment and scoured by gorges. Today those gorges are brimming with rainforests, washed by waterfalls.
Over thousands of years, Aboriginal people have left behind some extraordinary galleries of Aboriginal art, with rock sites dating back 25,000 years. More than 1,000 sites have been recorded.
One thousand species of flora, 30 mammals, 75 reptiles, 1500 butterflies and moths, 50 freshwater fish and 25 species of frog have been discovered in Kakadu. During the lush green season Kakadu's flora puts on its most brilliant face. Between December and March visitors will see plants respond to the monsoonal showers with riotous growth.



Watarrka National Park
201 miles (323km) west of Alice Springs. The main attraction is Kings Canyon, a mighty canyon of pastel-colored walls reaching a height of 656ft (200m) and stretching for almost 1 mile (2km) See The Lost City and the Valley Eden with its lush vegetation of cycad palms. Self drive on dirt roads, some 4WD, or tours from Alice Springs are available.



Kata Tjuta National Park
Kata Tjuta National Park: 280 miles (450km) southwest of Alice Springs. Ayers Rock/ Uluru, the world's largest monolith and an Aboriginal sacred site is Australia's most famous natural landmark. Visitors may wish to make the tough 1.6km ascent to the top or take a walking tour around the rock with an aboriginal guide , learning about its fascinating with the Uluru people and its importance in dreamtime legend.

Also in this enormous park are many Aboriginal sacred sites, spectacular scenery and famous rock formations. Visit the Olgas/ Kata Tjuta, a dramatic series of 36 dome-like rock formations which stand up to 1,701ft (546m) high and cover an area of 35km and like Uluru, produce an incredible light show at sunset, with crimsons turning to rusts, and pinks to mauves.



Nitmiluk National Park
The spectacular Katherine Gorge in Nitmiluk National Park is a must-see. The 13 wonderful gorges of Nitmiluk National Park began 23 million years ago as torrents of water pouring along tiny cracks in the earth. The National Park is rich in Aboriginal art, with rock paintings representing the spiritual 'dreaming' of the Jawoyn people, the traditional owners of the land. More than 100 kilometres of walking tracks meander through the National Park including a five-day trek to Edith falls.



Watarrka National Park
Watarrka National Park contains the western end of the George Gill Range. This scenic landscape of rugged ranges, rockholes and gorges acts as a refuge for many plants and animals, making the Park an important conservation area and major attraction of central Australia. Kings Canyon features ancient sandstone walls, sculptured by the elements, rising up 100m to a plateau of rocky domes.
The Park is located about 450km southwest of Alice Springs and can be reached by 2WD vehicle via Luritja Road from Yulara and Lasseters Highway (sealed road). It can also be reached: via Larapinta Drive, through the West MacDonnell National Park, linking into the new gravel Mereenie Loop Road (4WD recommended); or via Ernest Giles Road (4WD essential) and Luritja Road. Careful driving techniques should be applied at all times to accommodate changing road conditions.


Finke Gorge National Park
Finke Gorge National Park covers an area of 46,000 hectares, and includes the impressive Palm Valley. Palm Valley is home to a diverse range of plant species many of which are rare and unique to the area, including the Red Cabbage Palm for which the Park is well known.
This species of Palm is restricted to this area, having a population of around 3,000 adult plants.
The Park and nearby areas hold cultural significance to the Western Arrernte Aboriginal people as well as displaying evidence of early European settlement of central Australia.
The Park is 138km (about 2 hours drive) west of Alice Springs. Turn south off Larapinta Drive just west of Hermannsburg. Access along the last 16km of road, which follows the sandy bed of the Finke River, is limited to 4WD vehicle only. Heavy rains may cause this section of the road to be impassable.
Commercial tour operators regularly visit the Park from Alice Springs.



Western Australia

Serpentine National Park
With beautiful waterfalls, bushwalking trails and an abundance of native wildlife, Serpentine National Park is an idyllic day-trip from Perth.
Located on the Darling Scarp, Serpentine National Park is known for Serpentine Falls which cascade over a sheer granite face.

The steep slopes of Serpentine River valley create a stunning landscape which is home to all kinds of birds and animals. Go bird watching and you could see as many as 70 different species of birds including red-capped parrots, western rosellas, red-tailed and white-tailed black-cockatoos, and yellow robins.
Kangaroos, wallabies, possums and many other animals also call the park home.

A 500 metre walk trail runs along the river and leads to the falls. There are barbecues, picnic areas, and public toilets available throughout the park which covers 4,300 hectares of land.
Serpentine National Park is about an hour’s drive from Perth


Nambung National Park
Home to the famous Pinnacles Desert about a three hour drive north of Perth, Nambung National Park is one of Western Australia's most unique natural attractions.

Here, thousands of huge limestone pillars rise from the shifting yellow sands and look more like something from a science fiction movie.
You can get up close to the Pinnacles on a scenic drive and walk trail that includes an amazing lookout over the park.
It's believed the Pinnacles were created millions of years ago as seashells were broken down into sand and then eroded by water and wind.

Nambung National Park also features secluded white sandy beaches perfect for swimming and snorkellig. Hangover Bay is one the best known with picnic tables, gas barbecues and a boat launch.
The windsurfing and surfing is top-notch - and you might even see a bottlenose dolphin or sea lion swimming offshore.
From August to October the vegetation at Nambung National Park springs to life with colourful wildflowers.
The park is an easy to access by car or you can take a coach or four wheel drive tour to the Pinnacles from Perth.


Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park
The rugged coastline of the Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park around Yallingup offers excellent fishing and bird watching, world class surf breaks and stunning bush walks.

Cape Naturaliste is the most northern point of the Leeuwin-Naturaliste ridge. Here, a lighthouse acts as a maritime guide. There are bush walking tracks nearby with incredible views over the cape including a whale lookout.

The granite formations of Canal Rocks and Sugarloaf Rock offer dramatic scenery and are popular among experienced fishermen.
The beach and rock area south of Cape Naturaliste is home to some of the best surfing beaches in the State.
For excellent swimming conditions head to Yallingup, Ingidup, Smiths Beach and Bunker Bay.
The Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park is home to a range of native wildlife including possums, wallabies and kangaroos, while rare and endangered red-tailed tropic birds nest on Sugarloak rock.
You can enjoy beachside camping at Injidup, or there are plenty of other accommodation options available.
Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park Yallingup is about a three hour drive south of Perth



Porongurup National Park
The Porongurup National Park near Albany on Western Australia's south coast overflows with local flora and fauna, and offers excellent bushwalking with stunning panoramic views of the surrounding plain.
The park is one of the best places in the south for wildflowers - head here in spring and early summer for colourful displays of bluebells, wattles, hoveas, banksia, dryandras, hakeas, grevilleas and orchids. There are more than 750 species of plants in the park and perhaps the most spectacular are the forests of karri trees.

The ancient granite domes that rise 670 metres into the air are popular with rock climbers, while bird watches flock here to see brilliantly coloured scarlet and yellow robins, as well as rufous treecreepers. You might also spot western grey kangaroos and brush wallabies.
There are plenty of scenic picnic spots and the park provides barbeque and toilet facilities. You can drive to Porongurup National Park in 40 minutes from Albany, or about four hours from Perth.


Walpole-Nornalup National Park
See giant red tingle trees at Walpole-Nornalup National Park in the south of Western Australia. These towering old growth forests are part of the Walpole Wilderness area and have remained virtually untouched.

To get up close to these pristine forest beauties visit the Valley of the Giants and Tree Top Walk to the east of Walpole. You can get a magnificent view of the forest canopy from the Tree Top Walk, while the Valley of the Giants leads you to giant red tingle trees with trunks up to 20 metres in circumference.
Walpole-Nornalup National Park is also home to a rugged coastline, peaceful inlets, rivers and forests of karri trees.
In the south-west of the park, about 5000 hectares of near-pristine bushland has been set aside for bushwalkers. The famous Bibbulumun Track passes through the Walpole-Nornalup National Park on its 1,000 kilometre route from the Perth hills to Albany.
If you’re visiting between February and April there’s also the chance to see the annual migration and spawning run of the Australian salmon.

there are camp sites dotted throughout the park.
The park surrounds the towns of Walpole, Nornalup and Peaceful Bay, a five hour drive south of Perth.


Yanchep National Park
Yanchep National Park offers you a choice of nine interesting walk trails ranging in length from 500 metres to 55 kilometres. Along the way you will witness spectacular scenery and panoramic views from the sea to the scarp.

Choose a walk trail to suit your personal level of fitness and time frame. See collapsed cave systems, gorges, pristine coastal wetlands, beautiful lakes, or haunted historic remains.
Appreciate the diverse range of trees including Banksia, Tuart, Marri, Stunted Jarrah, Sheoak and Paperbark. During spring kangaroo paws and cat paws are in flower and during July and August, the Yanchep Rose and the Parrot Bush are in full flower.

Animal and bird watchers can follow the Carnaby Black Cockatoo or seek out the Black-glove Wallaby and Quenda (bandicoots).
Gain an insight into Aboriginal culture following the Yaberoo Budjara trail which is based on Yellagonda, (a significant local Nyoongar elder) and his people’s movements in the area.
Longer walk trails such as the three and a half day Coastal Plain Walk provides facilities including huts, water tanks and bush toilets.

Yanchep National Park is just 45 minutes north of Perth. Trail maps are available from the visitor centre



Purnululu national park
Explore Australia's North West and be fascinated by the natural wonders of Purnululu National Park. Famous for the Bungle Bungle Range, the national park is one of the most amazing geological landmarks in Western Australia.

From an aircraft, the Bungle Bungle Range is an imposing sight. The orange and black stripes across the beehive-like mounds, encased in a skin of silica and algae, are clearly visible as you approach from the south. As you sweep further over the range, a hidden world of gorges and pools is revealed, with fan palms clinging precariously to walls and crevices in the rocks.
The range rises up to 578 metres above sea level and stands 200 to 300 metres above a woodland and grass covered plain, with steep cliffs on the western plain.

Although the Bungle Bungle Range was extensively used by Aboriginal people during the wet season, when plant and animal life was abundant, few Europeans knew of its existence until the mid-1980s. The park offers a remote wilderness experience. The area is rich in Aboriginal art and there are also many burial sites.

Several species of rare animals can also be found in the park.
Constant erosion and river movements have formed the huge black and orange striped domes over the last 20 million years.

There are general public camping facilities at Walardi or Kurrajong Camp with both sites having limited facilities with bush toilets and limited water. Petrol, water and supplies are available from Turkey Creek which is an approximate three hour drive from the park on a typical bush track. It is advised that visitors carry in all food and water.

There are several privately operated campgrounds offering meals, accommodation and tours with bookings essential.


Geikie Gorge National Park
See fresh water crocodiles, all manner of birdlife, and other native animals like dingos and wallabies at Geikie Gorge National Park in the Kimberley region.
The main attraction is the multi-coloured cliffs of Geikie Gorge where the Fitzroy River has cut through fossil reef over millions of years.
You can take a cruise along the river to see the gorge and wildlife up close – and learn about Aboriginal Dreamtime stories of the area.

Geikie Gorge is an important Aboriginal cultural area and is known by the Bunaba people as Darngku.
The national park covers more than 3,000 hectares of land and is also home to a riverine forest of river red gum trees and paper barks. Some areas are covered with wild passionfruit vine.
Pack a picnic and enjoy the tranquillity of the wilderness, or go bushwalking along two dedicated trails.

Rock climbing is also permitted.
The best time to visit the park is from May to October when the weather is mild.
you can get to Geikie Gorge National Park by driving about 20 minutes from the town of Fitzroy Crossing


Karijini National Park
Two billion years in the making, Karjini National Park is one of Western Australia's most spectacular natural attractions offering amazing hiking trails through ancient gorges.
With massive gorges, crystal clear rock pools and waterfalls, Karijini National Park is a must for anyone with a thirst for adventure.
Explore tunnels of marbled rock, clamber over boulders, squeeze through narrow tunnels, paddle through waterways and descend deep into ancient chasms.
There's also easy access to stunning lookouts and walk trails of varying levels so everyone can experience this awesome landscape.

Permanent water pools means there's always the chance for a refreshing swim. There are excellent picnic areas as well as allocated camping sites within the park.
Karijini National Park is located about two hours drive from the town of Newman. It's best accessed by joining a four wheel drive tour. There are a number of tour operators taking visitors from Perth to Karijini and the surrounding region.


Wolfe Creek Crater National Park
One of Australia’s most remarkable outback landscapes, massive Wolfe Creek Crater, lies on the edge of the Great Sandy Desert in the East Kimberley.
Wolfe Creek Crater is the second largest crater in the world, measuring 880 metres across and to a depth about 60 metres below the rim.
Go bushwalking and see the crater from the rim – you’ll feel dwarfed by its size.

There’s also an information shelter where you can learn about the landform.
The Aboriginal Dreamtime story tells of two rainbow snakes crossing the desert and creating Sturt and Wolfe Creeks by emerging from the ground.
For a true taste of the wilderness there’s a camp ground with basic facilities.
Wolfe Creek Crater National Park is about a two to three hour drive from Halls Creek via the Tanami Road which accessible by conventional vehicles


WesternAustralia
SouthAustralia
Queensland Holidays
Parkweb Victoria
atn
NT
NSW

*All information sourced from the above websites provided


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starlagurl
post Aug 19 2009, 09:40 AM
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Thanks Gerre! Which ones have you been to?


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introducinlyric
post Aug 19 2009, 08:52 PM
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Thanx Louise smile.gif ive been to quite a few i love the royal national park which is said to be the 2nd oldest in the world. i really should start updating my travelblog with all the various mini trips ive taken in past year but i ust havent lol
i should add photos to this post soon as it is a little bland lookin hehe


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purplebuggy
post Aug 20 2009, 02:28 AM
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Great post, I wish there was one site/ organisation that covered all states instead of only a few national governed and everything else state by state.

My favourites are Kakadu and Litchfield NPs.

pb
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post Aug 20 2009, 08:59 AM
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I wanna see the pictures!


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post Aug 20 2009, 04:32 PM
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QUOTE(purplebuggy @ Aug 20 2009, 02:28 AM) *

Great post, I wish there was one site/ organisation that covered all states instead of only a few national governed and everything else state by state.

My favourites are Kakadu and Litchfield NPs.

pb


I loved Kakadu and Litchfield. It was also unique for me to pay for your campsite on a honesty system!! Also loved the Grampians - but mainly as it was my first wild koala spotting smile.png

Pictures for you Louise:

Koala

IPB Image

Sunrise:
IPB Image



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sianeth
post Sep 10 2009, 07:26 AM
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Blue Mountains, Katoomba

IPB Image

Noosa National Park

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Jervis Bay

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Flinders Ranges National Park

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post Sep 15 2009, 01:32 AM
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Great pics Sian smile.gif !!!!


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post Oct 11 2009, 07:19 PM
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Thanks for your list but you can't forget the NSW Central Coast which has Lake Macquarie State Conservation Area with its 16km of coast with wildlife such as kangaroos, wallabies and colourful birds.

Bouddi National Park sits between magnificent forests and beautiful secluded beaches. You can camp at Putty Beach as well.

Wyrrabalong National Park spans The Entrance and has great walking tracks and beaches.

Make sure that you take a trip to the Central Coast when visiting Australia and get out into our beaches and National Parks.

Stuart
http://www.BookCentralCoast.com.au
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post Oct 11 2009, 08:07 PM
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What a wonderful thing to do! so many people do not realise what is at their own front door and this will help people get out and see it.
You have done a good Coverage of the NT (which is where I am based) additional information can be found at the following web link;
http://en.travelnt.com/?cid=i0

Come on people! Get out there and see your own back yard sometime!


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post Oct 12 2009, 05:30 PM
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QUOTE(stuarth @ Oct 11 2009, 07:19 PM) *

Thanks for your list but you can't forget the NSW Central Coast which has Lake Macquarie State Conservation Area with its 16km of coast with wildlife such as kangaroos, wallabies and colourful birds.

Bouddi National Park sits between magnificent forests and beautiful secluded beaches. You can camp at Putty Beach as well.

Wyrrabalong National Park spans The Entrance and has great walking tracks and beaches.

Make sure that you take a trip to the Central Coast when visiting Australia and get out into our beaches and National Parks.

Stuart
http://www.BookCentralCoast.com.au


thankx for adding these NP's to the list smile.gif


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post Oct 27 2009, 12:08 PM
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Wow great parks! But i became more interested in Blue Mountains, Katoomba. I think it such a lovely place or a paradise. Can't wait to visit Australia soon. My aunt is living there and inviting me to have a vacation there. I think it would be nice to have a vacation in Australia. So many wonderful places to visit.


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post Dec 14 2009, 02:08 AM
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QUOTE(scarlet0906 @ Oct 27 2009, 12:08 PM) *

Wow great parks! But i became more interested in Blue Mountains, Katoomba. I think it such a lovely place or a paradise. Can't wait to visit Australia soon. My aunt is living there and inviting me to have a vacation there. I think it would be nice to have a vacation in Australia. So many wonderful places to visit.



blue mountains are great you'll have a good time there if u choose to visit the blue mountains


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post Jan 10 2010, 06:19 PM
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QUOTE(travelbug001 @ Jan 7 2010, 02:52 AM) *

QUOTE(travelbug001 @ Jan 7 2010, 02:50 AM) *

Don't forget the smaller National Parks. I visited one in Victoria, Australia, just last week.
Tarra-Bulga National Park, a superb rainforest with ancient myrtle beech and towering mountain ash with tree fern, animals and many birds including lyrebirds (we are unlucky as we don’t see any animals or lyrebirds). There are so many beautiful picnic places to enjoy your lunch, so don’t forget your picnic basket. Read more about it in my diary. http://travelbug001.blogspot.com/





feel free to add small or large NP's to this list , as i posted in original post i couldnt possibly add every NP


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post Jan 31 2010, 06:35 PM
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Katoomba, NSW is great. It can get a bit cold in winter though. I suppose it depends on where you are from as to whether you will enjoy it that time of year. I am personally a sun dweller.

There are some great places to visit if you base yourself at Katoomba.

Like the south coast of Wollongong and the north coast of Central Coast and Newcastle, with both having some fantastic beaches and scenery.

I personally love the Myall Lakes. It is a travellers must!

This peice of paradise is home to all house boat and boat lovers from all walks of life, it has some great accomodation and the water you swim is full of tea tree oil, from the trees on the side banks. It is one of our largest lakes - visit Nerani Camping Area on my site - p18130 to see the pictures it's fantastic or visit our website soon... www.ozwit.com which will be operational soon.

Thanks Raquel
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QUOTE(nixsboys @ Aug 20 2009, 04:32 PM) *

QUOTE(purplebuggy @ Aug 20 2009, 02:28 AM) *

Great post, I wish there was one site/ organisation that covered all states instead of only a few national governed and everything else state by state.

My favourites are Kakadu and Litchfield NPs.

pb


I loved Kakadu and Litchfield. It was also unique for me to pay for your campsite on a honesty system!! Also loved the Grampians - but mainly as it was my first wild koala spotting smile.png

Pictures for you Louise:

Koala

IPB Image

Sunrise:
IPB Image





Awesome Koala! I remember my stuffed toy Koala bear gave to me by one of my suitors blow.gif dance.gif frantics.gif party.gif


Carol Burnett on dvd
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post Sep 25 2010, 10:42 PM
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QUOTE(kristain77 @ Jul 13 2010, 01:27 AM) *

Hi friend, really excellent and informative post. All these National parks are truly amazing. I just love Freycinet National Park. The Freycinet National Park is one of the popular nation park in Australia. The Freycinet National Park is located in Tasmania, Australia. Most of visitors are visits every year. The place is one of the best in the wohole world. In the Freycinet you can find some amazing views. And the main attractions of the place alonge the Wineglass Bay, Breyans Beaches, Coles Bay and the Mount Freycinet. It is really fantastic place. Well i have interestiong information about that you can find here Freycinet National Park
IPB Image

Thanks,
Kristain flowers.png




hi... Great pics..........Australia has one of the largest and greatest national park systems in the world, covering over 24 million hectares, with such diversity as lush rain forest to waterless desert.Parks are really awesome.They really attract peoples.At Byron Bay villa, there is really beautiful rain forests and parks. I had a great fun over there. You must visit there.
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post Oct 26 2010, 01:26 AM
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Hi,
Thanks a lot for sharing. I am planning to visit Australia since years lets see when this would come.... dance.gif
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post May 25 2011, 08:46 AM
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The place looks great. The photos are amazing. Thanks for detailed information flowers.png
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post Nov 1 2012, 12:02 AM
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Is there any Worth Visiting park in Melbourne ?
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