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> Handy Irish Phrases..., ...if you find yourself in the Gaeltacht...
kathryn77
post Jul 27 2009, 03:13 PM
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What language is spoken in Ireland? English, right? Well yes, but Irish is also a mandatory part of the schooling system here, and is the first language in Gaeltacht regions.

Here's some handy phrases if you want to visit one of the Gaeltacht pockets of Ireland...

Word(s) written first (phonetical in brackets) - translation

Céad míle fáilte! (Kade Meela Fall-Cha!) - 100,000 welcomes!
Conas atá tú? (Ku-niss a-thaw 2?) - How are you?
Día dhuít! (Jee-ya Gw-itch!) - Hello! (Literally means 'God be with you')
Slán go fóíl! (Slawn go fole!) - Goodbye for now!
Cad ís aínm duít? (Cod iss an-im thitch?) - What is your name?
.....ís aínm dom (....iss an-im dhum) - My name is ........
Le do thoíl (leh duh hull) - Please
Go raíbh míle maíth agat (guh rev mee-la moh a-guth) - Thank you very much



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starlagurl
post Jul 31 2009, 08:55 AM
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Do people actually use these phrases in Ireland?


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kathryn77
post Jul 31 2009, 12:34 PM
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QUOTE(starlagurl @ Jul 31 2009, 02:55 PM) *

Do people actually use these phrases in Ireland?


Mainly in the Gaeltacht regions, but yes. Everything in Ireland is in dual language - street signs etc - it's a legal requirement, and a compulsory part of the schooling system.

When you're travelling, you find Irish people - if they know how to speak it - will use this language in bargaining situations or the like to talk to their friend (because NO ONE can understand it as the language is so different to any - the exception being Scottish Gaelic, which is quite similar, but equally 'out there' in terms of the difference v's modern languages)

The word for 'Scotland' for example in Scottish Gaelic is 'Alba', and in Irish it's 'Albain' (I may have the spelling wrong on that one)


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greekcypriot
post Jul 31 2009, 01:32 PM
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While in Ireland last year I noticed that signs were written in both languages.
But once or twice when getting into a taxi and trying to get information, it was impossible for me to understand because even if they try to speak English you cannot understand them clearly. At first I thought I was deaf! I kept asking the man to repeat and repeat until I could not ask for more repeating.... I said yes, thank you and stopped trying to communicate further.

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kathryn77
post Aug 1 2009, 06:19 AM
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QUOTE(greekcypriot @ Jul 31 2009, 07:32 PM) *

While in Ireland last year I noticed that signs were written in both languages.
But once or twice when getting into a taxi and trying to get information, it was impossible for me to understand because even if they try to speak English you cannot understand them clearly. At first I thought I was deaf! I kept asking the man to repeat and repeat until I could not ask for more repeating.... I said yes, thank you and stopped trying to communicate further.

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LOL, yeah, there's a lot of strong accents too, so I guess even the English is hard to understand. I have a friend who grew up in Malaysia and moved to Ireland last year. Her dad is Malaysian, her mum is Irish, so she learned English mainly from her mum - she doesn't have an accent as such, but every so often you'll hear an English, but Irish word thrown in there, like 'tree' instead of 'three' - it cracks me up no end!


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