Welcome to the TravelPod forums
This is the place where TravelPod bloggers exchange travel tips with each other. Have a question? Ask one of our Local Experts by clicking "new topic" in any category.

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Where to stay, what to do....???
pilch
post Feb 16 2009, 05:20 PM
Post #1


Newbie


Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: 16-February 09
Member No.: 269950
Nominate me as a Local Expert



Hi Everyone

My boyfriend and I are going to Tokyo in November and was just wondering where anyone would reccomend to stay? We have been told Asakusa is quite central and is close to a few must sees of Tokyo? Also is it worth travelling out side of Tokyo on our first trip there or will there be more than enough things to keep us busy?! We are going for 10 days.

Any help/advice would be much appreciated as we dont want to miss anything!!!

Cheers
User is offlinePM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
wakingdream
post Feb 16 2009, 07:16 PM
Post #2


Rolling Stone
********

Group: Local Expert
Posts: 5853
Joined: 18-August 06
From: Guelph, Ontario
Member No.: 13336




Hey there!

Sounds like a really exciting trip! I've not been to Tokyo (yet!) but I did find a bit of information I hope you find helpful.

IPB Image

Above is a map of the different areas in Tokyo.

The following areas are located in the central region;

Akasaka, Ochanomizu, Hongo and Akihabara. Asakusa is a popular tourist spot in the Kanto area where you'll also find Shibuya & Harajuku.

Here is a link to an interactive Tokyo map. I like interactive maps that show you what's where. You can click on the links right on the map to get more info. You can also zoom in and out to get a closer look.

Some major attractions are

Kaminari-mon
Tokyo Tower
Meiji jingu
Tsukiji market
Loads of shopping if you're into it
head to an onsen
if you head toward Kyoto/Nara on the bullet train you'll pass Mt Fuji
if you're into theatre visit the Kabuki-za theatre at the Ginza

Okay! I'm sure there are others who can give you some great advice too! Sounds like some people enjoy leaving Tokyo for a few days......


--------------------
~Susie

'Yesterday's the past and tomorrow's the future. Today is a gift - which is why they call it the present.'
User is offlinePM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
aopaq
post Feb 16 2009, 07:29 PM
Post #3


Tripper
******

Group: Local Expert
Posts: 1919
Joined: 31-May 06
Member No.: 893




I have not stayed in Asakusa but I know others who have and it was fine. Remember, Tokyo has an incredible transportation network (subway/trains) which means you can get almost anywhere fairly easily (once you figure out the system).

Tokyo, like any huge city (New York, London) has more than enough to keep you occupied for much longer than 10 days. However, it really depends what you are interested in. Personally, I would head to Kyoto at the very least as it is the ancient cultural centre of Japan. With the bullet train and the fact that Japan is not really that big, travel to places outside Tokyo is not that difficult. You really just need to decide what you want to see which depends on your interests.

With that said, I must thoroughly recommend trying out an onsen!!

User is offlinePM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
uktokyoite
post Feb 17 2009, 08:03 PM
Post #4


Expeditionist
****

Group: Local Expert
Posts: 220
Joined: 10-June 08
From: Tokyo
Member No.: 196192




Hi Aopaq,

Well Tokyo certainly has enough to entertain you for 10 days but it really depends on whether you're into city stuff or not.

If you are then high on my list would be:

Odaiba (man-made island in Tokyo Bay with shopping, big onsen, and entertainment galore).
Asakusa is a lovely area - it's the old part of the city with Sensoji Temple and Nakamise Dori (old style shopping street)
Shibuya - go at night and check out the Hachiko area just be ready for a swarm of people. It can be disorientating at first!
Ebisu is a favorite place of mine to chill out and wander round. On the East side of the station is Ebisu Garden Place - very upmarket with nice restaurants etc. On the West side is older style Tokyo and you can walk up to the area of Daikanyama - lots of small funky shops.
Ueno - has culture by the bucket load - museums, park, zoo etc.
Kichijoji - is an area to the West of the central Tokyo on the Inokashira Line from Shibuya. This is where you'll find Studio Ghibli (a famous anime museum but to call it a museum is kinda wrong as its a really magical place. If you do want to go to Studio Ghibli you have to book it in advance - you'll need to talk to a travel agent for this as you can't do it online. Tickets are usually fully booked at least a month ahead of time so you'd need to be booking this by September at the latest I would say. Also in Kichijoji is Inokashira Park which is lovely.

Still.... if you're not a city lover then you may get fed up of the scenery. If you don't want to jump on the bullet train there are several nice places only an hour or so away from Tokyo - check Nikko, Mount Takao, and Hakone.

Otherwise, if you do decide to travel to Kyoto and/or other areas (Kyoto is beautiful by the way and if you're into temples there are many) check out the Japan Rail Pass option offered by JR. This can save you a lot of money if you are traveling across the country. If you're only staying in Tokyo then don't bother but using the bullet train is expensive! The more you intend to travel the more the Rail Pass will save you.

Take a peek at my website if you like - I've tried to put info together that will help http://www.tokyotopia.com



--------------------
Cheers and all the best,

Honor

My Webpage
User is offlinePM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
wakingdream
post Feb 17 2009, 08:31 PM
Post #5


Rolling Stone
********

Group: Local Expert
Posts: 5853
Joined: 18-August 06
From: Guelph, Ontario
Member No.: 13336





QUOTE
(Kyoto is beautiful by the way and if you're into temples there are many)

That sounds awesome.

QUOTE
Asakusa is a lovely area - it's the old part of the city with Sensoji Temple and Nakamise Dori (old style shopping street)

This area sounds nice too. is it really touristy amid all the old parts?


--------------------
~Susie

'Yesterday's the past and tomorrow's the future. Today is a gift - which is why they call it the present.'
User is offlinePM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
uktokyoite
post Feb 18 2009, 07:57 PM
Post #6


Expeditionist
****

Group: Local Expert
Posts: 220
Joined: 10-June 08
From: Tokyo
Member No.: 196192




Fair question WakingDream - there is definitely more touristy stuff in the old part - it goes with the territory I guess, but the traditional events that go on are aimed at the Japanese and there are many participants. During the Sanja Matsuri, the biggest festival I believe in Tokyo, Asakusa is absolutely jam packed with Japanese people having a ball! Well worth going to as long as you can deal with the crowds smile.gif


--------------------
Cheers and all the best,

Honor

My Webpage
User is offlinePM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
wakingdream
post Feb 18 2009, 08:32 PM
Post #7


Rolling Stone
********

Group: Local Expert
Posts: 5853
Joined: 18-August 06
From: Guelph, Ontario
Member No.: 13336




QUOTE(uktokyoite @ Feb 18 2009, 08:57 PM) *

Fair question WakingDream - there is definitely more touristy stuff in the old part - it goes with the territory I guess, but the traditional events that go on are aimed at the Japanese and there are many participants. During the Sanja Matsuri, the biggest festival I believe in Tokyo, Asakusa is absolutely jam packed with Japanese people having a ball! Well worth going to as long as you can deal with the crowds smile.gif

Now that sounds really fun! Touristy or not, there are many places worth visiting from the sounds of it. And you're right, the more appealing any place is, the more tourists are going to head there. I just wondered....sometimes there are really, old,beautiful towns and cities(wherever) where you'd not see a single local, which sometimes seems very strange....smile.gif


--------------------
~Susie

'Yesterday's the past and tomorrow's the future. Today is a gift - which is why they call it the present.'
User is offlinePM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
uktokyoite
post Feb 19 2009, 01:01 AM
Post #8


Expeditionist
****

Group: Local Expert
Posts: 220
Joined: 10-June 08
From: Tokyo
Member No.: 196192




Lol - local ghost towns - I know what you mean! It's not something you see in Japan though, I think because it's still getting used to opening its doors to the rest of the world. It still doesn't have enough visitors and non-Japanese residents for this happen. I guess the place where it's closest to happening would be around Roppongi. Still there are plenty of Japanese people who like hanging out here as well smile.gif


--------------------
Cheers and all the best,

Honor

My Webpage
User is offlinePM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
pilch
post Feb 25 2009, 04:52 PM
Post #9


Newbie


Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: 16-February 09
Member No.: 269950
Nominate me as a Local Expert



Thanks Everyone for your help, cant wait to go!
User is offlinePM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
wakingdream
post Feb 26 2009, 09:13 AM
Post #10


Rolling Stone
********

Group: Local Expert
Posts: 5853
Joined: 18-August 06
From: Guelph, Ontario
Member No.: 13336





QUOTE
I think because it's still getting used to opening its doors to the rest of the world.


Really? Does that mean there aren't really that many tourists visiting? Or they're visitng but the Japanese are still getting accustomed to the visitors?

Where are some interesting places in Japan where you're unlikely to see many, if any, tourists (and maybe some cool temples too)? I know my husband really wants to go. He studied Ikedo for many years and is fascinated by Japanese culture. I'd love to go too, but more or less to more secluded places rather than busy urban areas.


--------------------
~Susie

'Yesterday's the past and tomorrow's the future. Today is a gift - which is why they call it the present.'
User is offlinePM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
rbisset
post Feb 27 2009, 05:11 AM
Post #11


Planet Pioneer
*******

Group: Local Expert
Posts: 2215
Joined: 3-May 06
From: Guildford, UK
Member No.: 692




I stayed in Asakusa and it's a good area. Easy to get to from the airport (train to Ueno, then 3 subway stops - about 1120yen when I was there). Quite a bit to see around there. The Sensoji temple is well worth a visit, next to the river for river tours. Only about 20 minutes from Shibuya on the Yamanote line which I used extensively! It might be a bit tricky getting back to Asakusa if you head out for a few drinks in Shinjuku at night.

I was in Japan for 10 days and went a bit mad. I blitzed it from Tokyo to Fukuoka in a day then made my way back to Tokyo via Hiroshima and Kyoto, with side trips to Miyajima and Himeji! Was a knackering 10 days but well worth it.

I really recommend Hiroshima. I think it's a brilliant little city with a tragic bit of history.

I'd recommend saving as much as possible as the pound is so weak against the yen right now sad.gif


--------------------
User is offlinePM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
wakingdream
post Feb 27 2009, 02:53 PM
Post #12


Rolling Stone
********

Group: Local Expert
Posts: 5853
Joined: 18-August 06
From: Guelph, Ontario
Member No.: 13336





QUOTE
I really recommend Hiroshima. I think it's a brilliant little city with a tragic bit of history.

Now that is a place I would not miss for the world if I were in Japan. I read and loved 'Hiroshima' by John Hersey, an American Pulitzer Prize-winner originally born in China. It recounts the lives of six survivors after the bomb. It is a phenomenal book. I highly recommend it.

What are some things you remember specifically about Hiroshima other than the obvious bigger picture? What is it like there now?


--------------------
~Susie

'Yesterday's the past and tomorrow's the future. Today is a gift - which is why they call it the present.'
User is offlinePM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post

Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic

 


- Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 16th April 2014 - 07:19 AM
Top Hotel Destinations in Japan

Atami Hotels
Beppu Hotels
Chino Hotels
Chiyoda Hotels
Chuo Hotels
Fukuoka Hotels
Hakodate Hotels
Hakone Hotels
Hakuba-mura Hotels
Hiroshima Hotels
Hokuto Hotels
Ito Hotels
Izu Hotels
Kanazawa Hotels
Kobe Hotels
Kumamoto Hotels
Kyoto Hotels
Matsumoto Hotels
Minamiuonuma Hotels
Minato Hotels
Myoko Hotels
Nagano Hotels
Nagasaki Hotels
Nagoya Hotels
Naha Hotels
Narita Hotels
Nasu-machi Hotels
Niigata Hotels
Nikko Hotels
Osaka Hotels
Sapporo Hotels
Sendai Hotels
Shimoda Hotels
Shinjuku Hotels
Taito Hotels
Takayama Hotels
Toba Hotels
Tokyo Hotels
Ueda Hotels
Yokohama Hotels



Copyright © 1997 - 2011 TravelPod.com, a proud founder of travel blogs on the web. All Rights Reserved.