Valley of the Gods Bed and Breakfast

Address: 1 Valley of the Gods Road, Mexican Hat, Utah, 84531, United States | B&B
 
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Location

This B&B, located on 1 Valley of the Gods Road, Mexican Hat, is near Valley of the Gods and Muley Point Overlook.
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Amenities

           

        TravelPod Member ReviewsValley of the Gods Bed and Breakfast Mexican Hat

        Reviewed by elainehayes

        Solar powered retreat ...

        Reviewed Oct 12, 2013
        by (63 reviews) , United Kingdom Flag of United Kingdom

        We were welcomed by Gary and Claire into their home. Our room was very comfortable and had a great view, even a little sun room, and chairs out on the verandah. The view during sunrise and sunset as the light plays in the valley is wonderful and the stars plentiful, but a bit chilly to stargaze. Breakfast was served at 8.00 for all guests, each day different and both very tasty and it was interesting chatting with fellow travellers. Possibly a slight disadvantage is the 10 mile drive to the San Juan Inn where food was dull, but maybe that's the trade-off for a secluded location beside a very small town with only a couple of eating choices.

        This review is the subjective opinion of a TravelPod member and not of TravelPod.com.

        TripAdvisor Reviews Valley of the Gods Bed and Breakfast Mexican Hat

        5.00 of 5 stars Outstanding
         

        Travel Blogs from Mexican Hat

        Goosenecks ... Natural Bridges ... Monument Valley

        A travel blog entry by elainehayes on Oct 12, 2013

        40 photos










        On leaving Cortez, we drove along the McElmo Canyon, where we found Sutcliffe Vineyards. We met Joe the winemaker, and David the nephew of the owner who told us about the winery and how the canyon has been used for growing produce since the Navajo grew peach trees there. He let us sample a couple of …

        This really is John Wayne territory

        A travel blog entry by jordansgo on Oct 02, 2015

        12 photos

        ... an underground circular room used for meeting and ceremonial purposes and modelled on the old pit houses, entry by a ladder though the roof. Climbed back up the path for a quick visit to the museum.

        Already checked out from our hotel, we headed straight off to our next destination Monument Valley. This entails crossing through the Navajo Reservation. What a depressing place. The Navajo Indians (it seems that calling them Indians is OK) ...

        A monumental experience

        A travel blog entry by jobyn on Sep 29, 2015

        22 photos

        ... so ugly had been built next to a major source of hydro electricity.

        Lunch was just cold meat and salad in the shade of the bus before heading off to Monument Valley.

        Then into the bus for a long drive. Some parts had spectacular scenery, other parts not so much, but there was plenty of dozing and chatting going on.

        Arrival at Monument Valley revealed the scenery, as buttes, mesas and spires were explained to us. We were told to set up camp, ...

        Valley of the Gods and Hovenweep

        A travel blog entry by villadale on Sep 19, 2015

        10 photos

        ... not so much red as MV. This land is controlled by the Bureau of Land Management, so there was no charge. I am not sure if I mentioned it but MV is entirely on Navajo Reservation land so you pay a fee to them to access the park (it was included in our tour price). The nice part about this trip was we controlled the speed and the stops for photos. Another new feature of our camera is an easy panorama setting that Peg has been experimenting ...

        Gooseneck and Monument Valley

        A travel blog entry by villadale on Sep 18, 2015

        10 photos

        ... br> The gooseneck label refers to the bends in the San Juan River. You enter the park and drive the short distance to the overlook (of course stopping at the outhouse first). The overlook is on the edge of a black and gray sandstone canyon and looks down 1000 feet to the river below. In front of the overlook are 4 bends to the river. In this section of the river it flows over a distance of 6 miles while advancing only 1.5 miles westward. This is ...