Riad Aliya

Address: 10, derb Akerkour, Marrakech, 40000, Morocco | 4 star b&b
 
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Location

This 4 star B&B, located on 10, derb Akerkour, Marrakech, is near Ali Ben Youssef Medersa (Madrasa), Bahia Palace, Koutoubia Mosque and Minaret, and Museum of Marrakesh.
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    TripAdvisor Reviews Riad Aliya Marrakech

    4.50 of 5 stars Outstanding
     

    Travel Blogs from Marrakech

    Second-last night in Morocco

    A travel blog entry by tobequitefrank on Jul 03, 2015

    4 comments

    ... 9pm; the speaker towers blasting prayers in the early hours of the morning preparing everyone for the next day of fasting. While our dinners have sometimes been delayed there have never really been any issues and so it has been a great experience to see such a significant religious practice in action. After a final look around the area we gathered together and walked back to the same bus station we'd been dropped off at two days earlier. The coach trip back to Marrakech was ...

    Lost in the souks

    A travel blog entry by tobequitefrank on Jun 30, 2015

    1 comment, 7 photos

    ... opulent residence of the Grad Vizier Bou Ahmed and named after the favourite of his 28 wives. The diplomatic area enjoyed a beautiful small garden and like all Moroccan buildings it was bedecked with stunning mosaic work and ornately decorated cedar ceilings. Beyond this was an entertainment room with a high ceiling of stained glass (an influence of the French), a decorative fountain in the middle of the marble floor and a niche for a blindfolded band to entertain ...

    Melting in Marrakech

    A travel blog entry by tobequitefrank on Jun 29, 2015

    2 comments, 9 photos

    ... While the peaks were just as shapely as the northeastern end of the High Atlas, there were more pines and less cedar and the volcanic basalt and granite imbued them with much grayer colours. We took the Atlas' highest road crossing (2,260 metres) and had some awesome views at a stop just past the peaks. The area is unsurprisingly tremendously popular with hikers, with beautiful grassy plateaus and a couple of waterfalls fed by the last of the snowmelt. After lunch at ...

    Journey to the Sahara

    A travel blog entry by helenbond1953 on Nov 10, 2014

    4 comments, 23 photos

    ... took us through more both interesting landscapes and glimpses of how people have adapted to the harsh landscape. Our first stop was the Katari water system, used right up until 1985, enabling the locals to easily access water in the desert from the High Atlas. It was 45 km of tunnel dug at slightly different depths so that the water is always travelling down hill and each well seemed to be about 100 metres apart and this allowed villages to easily access water. We walked ...

    Off to the Sahara

    A travel blog entry by melaniegardiner on Jul 24, 2013

    6 photos

    ... with a South Westerly wind. He was like a walking fact machine. We were quick to fashion out shawls into Berber turbans like the locals to protect our little white heads and wandered around in a dazed heat. It didn't detract from the appreciation of the surroundings though, the place was unreal! The kasbah buildings reflected my imagination of Morocco, everything looked like it was fashioned out of clay with beautiful (yet modest and practical) archways and alleyways. ...